Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

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Follow the “1% rule” when dealing with upset employees—especially if you’re the target. The rule: At least 1% of what angry employees say is accurate, regardless of how much they generalize.
One employee does a terrific job but is needy with a capital N—frequently visiting your office for heart-to-hearts about a slew of worries. Your challenge is to give the staffer adequate guidance without letting the person monopolize your time.
Fitting the right people into the right jobs makes a huge impact on productivity and morale. Yet some studies indicate that up to 70% of workers are “misemployed,” working in positions for which they aren’t the best-suited employees.
Kathleen Brush, a 25-year veteran of international business and author of The Power of One: You’re the Boss, warns managers at all levels to avoid being one of these terrible bosses:
If you want to blow your competition out of the water, you need more than just a great idea. You need a team that can turn that idea into reality.
Take some comfort in some historic business mistakes ... Say "no" to corporatespeak ... Don’t sacrifice quality.
A public-relations whiz, Sam Calagione of Dogfish Head Brewery does not view competing breweries as enemies. He rightly concluded that any positive publicity for rival brands would benefit his business.
It’s time for a new discussion on women in leadership, says Avivah Wittenberg-Cox, who heads a gender consulting firm.
After more than two years of testing a Doritos-flavored taco shell, Taco Bell still had not signed a contract to partner with the company that made Doritos. So as the date neared for a major launch, CEO Greg Creed invited Frito-Lay’s CEO to a meeting where they forged a handshake deal. Creed’s eagerness to forge ahead without an official contract paid off.
After you've mastered making a good impression, don't forget how to build rapport and alliances with co-workers.