Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

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Richard Anderson, CEO of Delta Air Lines, applies certain rules to each work­­day. He attributes his success largely to his ability to follow these rules to operate more productively, gain insight and make smarter decisions.
Well-written performance goals help energize employees and point them in right direction. But some managers and HR pros have trouble finding the right words. Here are 10 phrases to adapt, from 2600 Phrases for Setting Effective Performance Goals by Paul Falcone.
In 2000, Julio Linares became CEO of Spain’s dominant telecom company, Telefónica de España. With the com­pany’s earnings and cash flow in a deep dive, he knew he needed to implement changes immediately.
The three criteria for polite communication that we probably learned as kids haven't changed one iota since then—so why have so many on the staff never been able to internalize them?
#2, based on a study of nearly 400 organizations, is strategic thinking. So #1 is...?
Mike “Coach K” Krzyzewski, head coach of the Duke men’s basketball team, has many on-the-court successes. He was the first Division  I men’s basketball coach to reach 1,000 wins, he has five national championships and he coached the 2008 and 2012 U.S. Olympic teams to gold medal victories. Take his advice for leading a team to success.
As a young pharmaceutical salesman, James LeVoy Sorenson spent many hours watching physicians make their rounds in hospitals. His careful observation led him to develop a range of tools they could use to save time and provide better results for patients.
An Enneagram, which dates back at least 2,000 years, derives from the Greek words “ennea,” or nine, and “gram,” something written or drawn. It refers to nine points on the circumference of a circle that correspond to nine styles you can develop as a leader.
A recent survey revealed many people would be more engaged in their work if only their bosses could paint a picture of their future.

Some executives equate leading with infallibility. They assume that they must project an intimidating I-know-­everything superiority to earn the respect of their team. Yet attempting to know it all is an exercise in futility.