Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

Courage is the first of human qualities because it is the quality that guarantees all the others, said Winston Churchill, who epitomizes what leadership is all about.

To be eligible for FMLA leave, employees have to show more than that they suffer from a serious health condition. They must also show that they can’t perform at least one essen­tial job function because they have that condition or are undergoing treatment for it. For employers, that means it’s necessary to compare the employee’s certification and his job description.

These days, crisis is the new normal. “The people who are going to thrive in the future are those who can use this pressure to excel, as oxygen. People who have translated very difficult circumstances into opportunity,” says Justin Menkes, author of Better Under Pressure. What characteristics do such leaders share?

When dashing off your next memo, report or e-mail, cut right to the core points. HR directors from half of the 120 major American corporations polled in a recent study said they consider writing ability when making promotions. "You can't move up without writing skills," one HR director said.

To pass the torch gracefully to Generations X and Y, boomers need to explain a few things: 1. Manners still matter. 2. Don’t reinvent the Edsel. 3. We care about spelling and grammar. 4. We need to feel valued and respected.

Instead of reinventing the wheel every time you repeat a task, create a template and then reuse it. For years, Michael Hyatt, CEO of Thomas Nelson Publishers, has used templates to improve his productivity ...

Even in his youth, Ulysses S. Grant picked his battles. Arriving at West Point to study, he decided against arguing with the adjutant about his own name (actually Hiram Ulysses) and accepted the name given to him in a mix-up, realizing it would serve him better than the initials H.U.G.

Through force, grit and bombast—and being one with his team—Adm. William “Bull” Halsey secured a decisive naval victory at Guadalcanal and a turning point in the South Pacific during World War II.

For a high achiever, the thought of doing a poor or even so-so job is abhorrent. That’s why so many leaders find their upward trajectory fizzle to a plateau. Rather than trying something new and risking poor performance, they lock into routine. How to get past self-imposed obstacles:

Say one of your employees stops by your office with a troubled look on her face. She has a complaint, but wants to speak with you “off the record.” Can you comply with her request for confidentiality? Should you? It all depends on the content and context of the complaint.