Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

When United Airlines was making its first big purchase of the 737 aircraft, it ran into a disagreement with pilots. United believed that two pilots should fly the plane while the union wanted three pilots. That management and union leadership reached an impasse is no huge surprise. But what is surprising is what came next.
The recent failure of the Atlanta Public School system is an example of what can go wrong if you have a failure of leadership. At the root of the scandal was leadership that rewarded the wrong behavior and punished the correct behavior.
When deciding who should get the ax during cost-cutting reductions in force, use as many objective factors as possible. For example, use performance measures that include specific achieve­­­ments and rankings based on those achievements.
Watch out if a supervisor starts keeping extra-close tabs on an employee’s work in the wake of declining productivity or a poor review. You must make sure all employees in a similar situation get the same close attention.
The “What Were They Thinking” file is full of stories about managers with a distorted view of team building exercises. Their misguided efforts not only crushed morale but triggered expensive legal claims. Leading nominees from the Hall of Shame just in the past year…

A comprehensive document management system can help your business boost productivity, improve the bottom line and stay out of legal trouble. Here are three ways to organize files for easy retrieval, establish a record retention schedule and tame your wild email inbox.

Say you have one right-hand manager whom you’ve relied on for years.  That person suddenly resigns. You have to choose a replacement from several competent managers. Who will get the plum promotion? There are five essentials that most CEOs share and look for in people they promote:

CEOs don’t often busy themselves with IT considerations, until a crisis threatens. So it was for Ted Chung, CEO of South Korea’s largest consumer-finance company, who was told by hackers that if he didn’t pay them $500,000, they’d release confidential information. The experience taught him several key lessons:

Even though it’s a cliché, it's still true that our greatest strengths can also be our greatest weaknesses. For Thomas Jefferson, his strength lay in trusting people. But when it came to financial matters—he trusted too much. To use the signature phrase of a much later president, Jefferson needed to “trust but verify.”

Nobody has to tell Google co-founder Larry Page to look for the big picture. He loves the grand quest and will challenge an employee by saying, “You’re not thinking big enough.”