Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

Many company leaders are looking at work/life flexibility to help employees manage their workloads, their time and their personal com­mitments without burning out. The surprise: Employees are resisting it. That means it’s up to HR to position flexibility as a po­ten­tial solution. Here are seven tactics to try:
Since my compulsion is to look at most things from a leadership angle, here are a few lessons I’ve learned so far from the practice of yoga: 1. Every day is different and is its own day. Yesterday is over. 2. Improve­ment comes incrementally, then suddenly. 3. Breathing can focus you. 4. Invest in your team and the results will follow.

Good news for the bosses of the world: Most employees (59%) say their direct supervisors are doing a good or even great job. However, 20% of the respondents to the CareerBuilder.com survey say their supervisors’ performance is poor or very poor. The biggest gripes?

Imagine a company with 100 middle managers, all smart, all hard-working. Who will get the plum promotion? Who will eventually land in the corner office? There are five essentials that most CEOs share and look for in people they promote.

Thirty years ago, Epcot opened, and Walt Disney Co. completed its original vision of the Disney theme park. Then its creative design and development team asked: Now what? Where could the company go next? To find the answer, Disney leadership called in Ron Alexander, a therapist and meditation teacher.

Courage is the first of human qualities because it is the quality that guarantees all the others, said Winston Churchill, who epitomizes what leadership is all about.

To be eligible for FMLA leave, employees have to show more than that they suffer from a serious health condition. They must also show that they can’t perform at least one essen­tial job function because they have that condition or are undergoing treatment for it. For employers, that means it’s necessary to compare the employee’s certification and his job description.

These days, crisis is the new normal. “The people who are going to thrive in the future are those who can use this pressure to excel, as oxygen. People who have translated very difficult circumstances into opportunity,” says Justin Menkes, author of Better Under Pressure. What characteristics do such leaders share?

When dashing off your next memo, report or e-mail, cut right to the core points. HR directors from half of the 120 major American corporations polled in a recent study said they consider writing ability when making promotions. "You can't move up without writing skills," one HR director said.

To pass the torch gracefully to Generations X and Y, boomers need to explain a few things: 1. Manners still matter. 2. Don’t reinvent the Edsel. 3. We care about spelling and grammar. 4. We need to feel valued and respected.