Leaders & Managers

From the nitty gritty of daily management to addressing your aspirations of leadership, this section for leaders & managers tells you how to make strong leadership decisions, build effective teams, delegate and stay above the everyday management muddle.

Get tips, strategies, tool and advice on: performance reviews, preventing workplace violence, best-practices leadership, team building, leadership skills, people management and management training.

Any time you look at only the successes, you will have skewed results. Leaders must look beyond “survivorship bias” at a larger body of leadership research. Good leaders focus on where the bullet holes are; great leaders consider where they aren’t.

It’s important to know the kind of language managers should—and should not—use in documentation. Test your knowl­edge by answering “True” or “False” to the following statements:
A glut of “yes” men is probably one reason Martha Stewart hasn’t made the comeback she so anticipated. Signs that she let ego get in the way of her business’s best interests:
Your mission? To produce minutes that remind everyone what needs to happen next, and assure them that their meeting time was well spent. These five suggestions will help you write minutes that yield results:
Rock icon Tom Petty challenged his record label, and won, when it wanted to raise album prices. “Look, I don’t need the extra dollar,” he told executives. “But it makes a big deal to the people buying the music.”
Four British men together led the scientific world in the early 1800s through a simple device: by meeting every Sunday morning over breakfast to talk about science. The men aimed to launch a new scientific revolution—and they pretty much did. Lesson: Bring together your peers to brainstorm on a regular basis.

Lately, Gianfranco Zaccai spends his time lying in a hospital bed. He’s not sick; he’s researching ideas for a health care client. As president at Continuum, Zaccai knows that he and his staff find the best ideas when they’re observing clients or putting them­­selves in clients’ shoes. He insists that staffers “go to where the lion is hunting, not the zoo.”

Billy Beane revolutionized the way baseball players are valued and also exploited the advantages of timing. The reason his Oakland A’s played like a different team in the second half of their 2001 season is because they were a different team. Their general manager, on a shoestring budget, had scooped up undervalued players right before the trading deadline ...

The wisdom of Eileen Gittins is that she keeps learning. In 2004, Gittins launched Blurb, where anybody can produce a pocket-size book for $2.95 or a coffee table book for about $200. Business is almost doubling every year.
Q. One of our employees secretly did an audio recording of his performance review meeting with his iPhone. Is that legal?