Management Training

Management training isn’t just for newbies and novices – managers and supervisors of all levels and all ages need actionable management practices to bring to their department, division or company. Learn how to be the best boss you can be by expanding your management skills, managing change effectively and bring strong leadership into your everyday management practices.

One important way to judge your success as a manger is by the success of your employees. An effective manager isn’t just a boss who can extract the most productivity from his people, but the one who produces great future managers. How can you be sure that under your leadership managers will blossom?

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Suicide is the 11th leading cause of death in the United States. What should you do if you learn one of your employees brandished a gun and threatened suicide, but a doctor released him back to work? Shouldn’t you be concerned about safety? What other kinds of liability might you face?

The U.S. Labor Department has announced it will no longer individually answer employers' specific questions about complex wage-and-hour issues. Instead of issuing opinion letters to respond to employers' questions, DOL will now offer "administrator interpretations" designed to offer general guidance on how to comply with federal pay laws.

The IRS has issued guidance to help small business owners make sense out of tax changes included in the monumental health care legislation. Although many provisions in the new law are prospective, the small business credit is available in 2010. The credit can potentially offset up to 35% of the health insurance premiums your business pays.

A good sick leave policy includes rules governing how employees are supposed to let their employers know that they’re ill. Employees generally have to follow those rules or face discipline. But there are circumstances under which employees may be excused from following the rules. One of those exceptions: when the employer has direct notice that the employee is ill and may need FMLA leave.

Debra Ring thought her chances for advancement at Roto-Rooter were just a pipe dream, and now she’s suing the national plumbing chain. The Cincinnati woman, who alleges that Roto-Rooter has a “tangible glass ceiling” that limits advancement for women, has filed a class-action lawsuit claiming the company systematically discriminates against women.

It’s sad but true: Disabled people are sometimes the butt of jokes at work. Whether the disability is obvious or the disabled employee lets co-workers know about his condition, you can expect somebody to say something inappropriate. Of course, some comments might be good-natured teasing. That doesn’t mean you should tolerate it.

Your best employees are probably eager for promotions. But when only one slot is open, promotions often leave several well-qualified candidates disappointed. To keep disappointment from leading to lawsuits, consider offering career coaching for those employees who didn’t make the cut.

Employees sometimes get angry if they’re implicated when a co-worker complains about alleged discrimination. They may retaliate by ostracizing the complainer. But that’s not enough to hold the company liable for retaliation—as long as it never knew about the problem.

As the name clearly implies, the federal Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) makes it illegal to discriminate against women who are pregnant. But it doesn’t mean pregnant employees are entitled to special privileges. In fact, the PDA merely makes clear that employers must treat pregnant employees the same way they treat every other employee.

Employers can use no-fault attendance policies as a way to control absenteeism. There’s no doubt about the effectiveness of no-fault programs, which allow a certain number of unexcused absences without any documentation, and then punish employees who go beyond allowable limits. But before you fire an employee for breaking your absenteeism rules, carefully consider whether he is eligible for FMLA leave.