Management Training

Management training isn’t just for newbies and novices – managers and supervisors of all levels and all ages need actionable management practices to bring to their department, division or company. Learn how to be the best boss you can be by expanding your management skills, managing change effectively and bring strong leadership into your everyday management practices.

One important way to judge your success as a manger is by the success of your employees. An effective manager isn’t just a boss who can extract the most productivity from his people, but the one who produces great future managers. How can you be sure that under your leadership managers will blossom?

Start your management training program here with our articles, tools, self-tests, and training sessions…

Page 61 of 344« First...102030...606162...708090...Last »

How many times have you used an employee’s performance review to find out how your performance is? Dan Rosensweig, CEO of Chegg, starts the conversation with the employee this way:

Stever Robbins, who dispenses advice on maximizing your creativity and whipping your e-mail into submission, now is integrating time management and innovation into a coherent system for getting things done. Here are tips from his new guide to working less and accomplishing more:

Question: My boss has promoted me, and I now manage five people. He wants me to do performance evaluations, but I have no idea what these employees’ salaries are. He feels that I don’t need to get involved in the “money” side of things. How can I establish my authority if I’m not given sufficient information to manage these people?

Employees feel overworked and underpromoted, and two in five of them are looking for new jobs. A new study is the latest to reveal that employees who plan to leave their companies say they feel a lack of communication from management. Here are four things your employees might think they’ll find more of elsewhere:

Alphabetize a list of names or addresses ... remove all hyperlinks ... remove hyperlinks ... move text quickly ... access synonyms while writing ... print multiple copies ....  add filler text.
Question: “Occasionally, when I need to get input quickly from another administrative assistant (same rank and file), she refuses to respond. This is frustrating, especially when my boss has asked me to set up a meeting, and the assistant to the key person won’t respond. I don’t want to take the issue to management, but I do want to know how to professionally handle this so we can effectively work together.” — Another Brick in the Wall
Question: ‘In my company, the only way to get a decent raise is to be promoted, so I decided to apply for a management job. I expected to receive the same salary as my friend, who has a similar position with another team.  When I got the promotion, my new boss didn’t say how much my raise would be. However, he asked me to commit to staying in his department.  I told him I would stay as long as the money was right. It turns out that I not only make less than my friend, but I also work about 50% more hours. This promotion has been bad for my health, my family, and the quality of my work.  At this point, even a huge raise would not make me happy. I want to transfer to a different department, but I am not sure how to go about it.” — Underpaid & Overworked
You’ve had it up to here. Now it’s time to fire a poor performing employee. As you’re about to do so, the employee wants to tell you something. But you tell her to “zip it.” Nothing she says will change your mind. As this case shows, you better zip it yourself and listen. Here’s why …

In a recent article, we pointed out several tax benefits for hiring a spouse. But your “better half” isn’t the only family member you can add to the payroll. Strategy: Give your children after-school jobs. By doing so, you can reduce the overall family tax bill and also avoid adverse "kiddie tax" consequences.

THE LAW: The FMLA allows eligible employees to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave annually to recover from a serious health condition or to care for an immediate family member with a serious health condition. To determine whether an employee or family member has a condition that meets the FMLA’s definition of “serious […]