Management Training

Management training isn’t just for newbies and novices – managers and supervisors of all levels and all ages need actionable management practices to bring to their department, division or company. Learn how to be the best boss you can be by expanding your management skills, managing change effectively and bring strong leadership into your everyday management practices.

One important way to judge your success as a manger is by the success of your employees. An effective manager isn’t just a boss who can extract the most productivity from his people, but the one who produces great future managers. How can you be sure that under your leadership managers will blossom?

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Question: “I am a store manager in a fast-growing retail company. A few months ago, a new CEO was brought in to run our business. Since his arrival, the company seems to be headed in the wrong direction. However, the CEO apparently believes everything is fine and no mistakes are being made. I contacted our former president to discuss my concerns; he suggested I request a meeting with the CEO. But a colleague who works with the CEO said I’d better have a new job lined up if I plan to complain ..."
For all the talk of teamwork in corporate America, your co-workers should be oozing with collaboration. Right? Yet that’s often not the case. What do you do about another administrative pro who gives you the cold shoulder? How do you draw more collaboration out of that co-worker?
Making variable pay work requires lots of interaction throughout the organization before, during and after implementation. As the business unit most likely in charge of implementation, it’s up to HR to make sure that happens. Here's how to do it.
Figuring out how to effectively — and legally — manage your team's personnel records is often a daunting task. But, developing a records retention schedule will ensure that you keep the records you need for operational, legal, fiscal or historical reasons, and then destroy them when they're no longer useful.
Unless an employee has a poor performance history, don’t fire him a few days after he reports harassment.

When an employee hires an attorney, you can bet that the lawyer will go looking for as many legal claims as possible. And high on the list of possible claims are wage-and-hour matters. That’s how something as simple as an unemployment compensation consultation can wind up turning into a major lawsuit.

Employees who claim they have been forced to work in a hostile work environment often lose their lawsuits because courts are reluctant to guarantee a civil workplace. But employers can’t accept horseplay, yelling, screaming and other unpleasant behavior at work. Here’s why:

Mary Louise Doyle, a nurse fired from the Bergen Regional Medical Center, has filed suit against her former employer, claiming she lost her job in retaliation for exposing improper practices at the hospital.
Employees who report concerns that co-workers are breaking the law may view themselves as whistle-blowers—and may believe that makes them untouchable if they themselves have done something wrong. Not true!
Unfortunately, many lawsuits come down to one person’s word against another’s. That’s powerful incentive for a company rule requiring at least two managers to participate in any discharge. Reason: They can back each other up.
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