Management Training

Management training isn’t just for newbies and novices – managers and supervisors of all levels and all ages need actionable management practices to bring to their department, division or company. Learn how to be the best boss you can be by expanding your management skills, managing change effectively and bring strong leadership into your everyday management practices.

One important way to judge your success as a manger is by the success of your employees. An effective manager isn’t just a boss who can extract the most productivity from his people, but the one who produces great future managers. How can you be sure that under your leadership managers will blossom?

Start your management training program here with our articles, tools, self-tests, and training sessions…

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Resist the hype to embrace online training for your employees.
In the past five years, many managers have adopted “open-book management” as a way to teach employees to link their jobs to the company’s larger financial performance. This way, staffers can see how their efforts directly affect the bottom line.
Q. I’m an administrative assistant at a fast-growing firm. Our office could benefit by hiring a junior marketer to help our one overworked salesman. I’m taking marketing classes to improve my skills. How can I convince management to create this position and promote me into it?
Q. I manage seven people in a low-profile, almost forgotten unit. I have a chance at a job in a growing department, but it’s a non-managerial position. Is it wise to give up my management duties for a job in a more visible and active part of the company?
Q. I work for a manager who comes in at 7:45 and leaves at 4:30 sharp whenever he is here (which is not often), and he takes an hour lunch. He hogs the credit for our work, and he avoids responsibility.
Only the most naive employees still believe that they’ll rise to the top on pure merit. Getting ahead requires a mix of political savvy, street-smart aggressiveness and common sense.
Men are stronger at business analysis and strategic planning and women are more results-driven, according to a recent study of North American managers.
When interviewing for a job, don’t dwell on why you left your last position.
Moods come and go, in yourself and others, but that doesn’t make you a helpless bystander. Without fanfare, you can control your own attitudes and handle fluctuating moods in your bosses and employees.
Most time-management books coach readers to set priorities and make lists. Jeffrey J. Mayer digs a bit deeper and offers more substantive advice on organizing your workday—and your attitude.
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