Management Training

Management training isn’t just for newbies and novices – managers and supervisors of all levels and all ages need actionable management practices to bring to their department, division or company. Learn how to be the best boss you can be by expanding your management skills, managing change effectively and bring strong leadership into your everyday management practices.

One important way to judge your success as a manger is by the success of your employees. An effective manager isn’t just a boss who can extract the most productivity from his people, but the one who produces great future managers. How can you be sure that under your leadership managers will blossom?

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A simple mistake—wrongly classifying employees as exempt when they should be hourly—can easily balloon into a multimillion-dollar overtime lawsuit. Often, the trick is knowing which workers exercise enough discretion to be properly labeled administrative exempt professionals. Our exempt/nonexempt self-audit helps you make the call.

Q. I bought a new car costing $60,000 in 2009. Can I deduct the sales tax for the new vehicle purchase plus an amount for the optional sales tax deduction?

Employers that let bosses get away with ethnic slurs risk having an unsympathetic jury decide whether and how severely to punish them. If you don’t send a strong message to those who use slurs that such behavior is unacceptable, you risk creating a corporate culture that encourages more of the same—and you may also empower supervisors to retaliate against the targeted employee.

Nothing speeds a disappointed job-seeker’s trip to court like a selection process based on an employer’s use of subjective criteria to make the hiring decision. That’s especially true if the biggest deciding factor is subjective, while objective factors receive lesser weight.

Some employees see discrimination everywhere and constantly complain. How you react can mean the difference between winning and losing a lawsuit. Keep cool no matter how often the employee runs to the EEOC. Focus on his work, not the complaints, and treat him like every other employee.

Sometimes it seems as though anything an employer does after an employee complains about discrimination can get turned into a retaliation case. It’s not actually that bad. The fact is, it’s only retaliation if it would dissuade a reasonable employee from complaining in the first place. Minor workplace changes don’t count.

The tax-exempt North Carolina High School Athletic Association apparently violated University of North Carolina policy when it paid bonuses to its managers. The association administers high school sports throughout the state. From 1999 to 2008, the association paid out $239,133 in bonuses to managers and $7,820 to nonmanagement staff. The employees won’t have to return the money.

Some employees believe they should be considered for a promotion just because they have the same job title as another employee being considered. But that’s not the case if the employees have different experience levels. For example, recent retirees may take entry-level jobs for which they are “overqualified.” When a promotion opportunity opens, their employer may be eager to use their talents more fully.

While employers generally are free to direct their workforces in reasonable ways to meet operational needs, they can’t retaliate against employees for complaining about possible discrimination. While a mere reassignment to another department in a retail store isn't retaliation, a transfer or series of transfers that limits future opportunities may be.

When a supervisor allegedly harasses a subordinate, all kinds of things can go wrong. But handled improperly, all fingers often point to employer liability. That’s why it’s vital to act quickly on any subordinate complaint.