Leadership Skills

Don’t just be a boss — be a leader. Maximize your leadership skills in the five most crucial areas: decision making, executive coaching, leadership training, strategic management and understanding your leadership style.

Situational leadership changes depending on the type of leadership (direction and support) each of your employee’s needs. Emotional leadership is based more on the theory of emotional intelligences and relates to the situation at hand.
Access more articles, tools and advice on maximizing your leadership skills.

In an interview with The Record (3/13/08, p. 20), rabbi and author Shmuley Boteach warned readers that there’s much more to life than the pursuit of professional success — something that many entrepreneurs are obsessed with.

At Google, anyone can be a leader—or at least act like one. The result is that anyone can be more effective, get more done, influence the process and support an innovative environment. To teach leadership to 20,000 employees, says Evan Wittenberg, head of global leadership development, Google leans on a few principles:

Perhaps you've heard of BHAGs: Big Hairy Audacious Goals. But you've never heard of BSAPs. That's because you're reading it here for the first time.
It’s easy to lead when everything’s rosy. But in times of disruptive change, leadership requires a different skill set.
Culture isn’t some vague, shapeless concept that’s constantly in flux. It’s actually a concrete, measurable set of characteristics. Define your culture and use it to your advantage.
Recently we interviewed Jim Whittaker. As the first American to reach the summit of Mount Everest, he shared his approach to achieve his goal.

Think for a second: Has the money you’ve spent on marketing grown your business this year? If not, it’s time to make changes in your 2010 marketing plans. No matter what type of marketing you use—e-mail, direct mail, ads, Internet, word-of-mouth—here are five simple changes guaranteed to boost results and revenue:

In my presentations and group coaching, I’m fond of quoting Charles de Gaulle’s observation that “The cemeteries are full of indispensable men.” Chairman of the Federal Reserve Ben Bernanke may be the exception to de Gaulle’s rule.

First, set aside the stereotype that the federal bureaucracy is inherently dysfunctional. Sure, it’s got plenty of faults. But Uncle Sam’s best-run agencies can actually teach private-sector employers a thing or two about HR. Here are eight lessons employers can learn from the biennial agency-by-agency ranking of federal employers:

Despite a two-year rise in job satisfaction between 2006 and 2008, about 212,000 federal workers consistently gave lower ratings than private-sector workers on their supervisors’ leadership skills, openness and willingness to help employees advance.