Leadership Skills

Don’t just be a boss — be a leader. Maximize your leadership skills in the five most crucial areas: decision making, executive coaching, leadership training, strategic management and understanding your leadership style.

Situational leadership changes depending on the type of leadership (direction and support) each of your employee’s needs. Emotional leadership is based more on the theory of emotional intelligences and relates to the situation at hand.
Access more articles, tools and advice on maximizing your leadership skills.

Boorish behavior and vulgar words are on the rise in U.S. workplaces. In fact, 38% of women say they’ve heard inappropriate sexual innuendoes and taunts in the workplace—up from 22% the year before. Such behavior can crush morale and increase turnover. Advice: Adopt a civility policy separate from your harassment policy.

It’s tough to manage people who hate making decisions. Your patience may wane as these worrywarts skirt issues.

If you’ve never had an official marketing plan, 2010 is the year to get one! The key to growing your business in a tighter market is to create a solid marketing plan and put it into action month by month. But how do you put a good plan into action given the constraints on your time and budget? Start by answering these six effort-focusing, money-saving questions:

HR Law 101: Let’s say a union has just won a representation election and now you’ve become a unionized employer. Suddenly, after running your own business, you’ve got a partner. No more unilateral decisions in dealing with your employees ...

Cyclists at this year’s Tour de France proved you don’t have to be the “leader” to dazzle people with your leadership skills. Teammates on one team acted like leaders when they helped propel one of their fellow cyclists to win six stages of the race.

In an interview with The Record (3/13/08, p. 20), rabbi and author Shmuley Boteach warned readers that there’s much more to life than the pursuit of professional success — something that many entrepreneurs are obsessed with.

At Google, anyone can be a leader—or at least act like one. The result is that anyone can be more effective, get more done, influence the process and support an innovative environment. To teach leadership to 20,000 employees, says Evan Wittenberg, head of global leadership development, Google leans on a few principles:

It’s easy to lead when everything’s rosy. But in times of disruptive change, leadership requires a different skill set.
Culture isn’t some vague, shapeless concept that’s constantly in flux. It’s actually a concrete, measurable set of characteristics. Define your culture and use it to your advantage.
Recently we interviewed Jim Whittaker. As the first American to reach the summit of Mount Everest, he shared his approach to achieve his goal.