Leadership Skills

Don’t just be a boss — be a leader. Maximize your leadership skills in the five most crucial areas: decision making, executive coaching, leadership training, strategic management and understanding your leadership style.

Situational leadership changes depending on the type of leadership (direction and support) each of your employee’s needs. Emotional leadership is based more on the theory of emotional intelligences and relates to the situation at hand.
Access more articles, tools and advice on maximizing your leadership skills.

Read how innovation can come from being uncomfortable and how it’s easier to motivate people who are at least slightly dissatisfied.
A new Society for Human Resource Management survey of 2,000 HR professionals cites these as the top five competencies that senior HR leaders need to succeed today:
In preparing the second edition of his book, The Next Level, leadership coach Scott Eblin will be offering new ways to handle specific situations and adding new perspectives on global business. Last year, Eblin met Frances Reimers, communications and program manager for Sister Cities International, who has great advice for young professionals moving into leadership:

If you’ve been a fan of Executive Leadership, you know that leadership lessons may come from anywhere. Steve Cody, a public relations consultant who blogs as The Repman, says he’s learned five things about leadership from practicing stand-up comedy.

Facebook and Twitter may be getting all the attention, but you still need to pay attention to LinkedIn. LinkedIn is important precisely because it is so stodgy and predictable as a business tool. Here’s how to work it:

Learn how to pinpoint problems when they arise to save more time when solving them.
The secret of learning how to lead: showing a lot of respect but little bossiness.
While it’s great to feel comfortable in your own skin, refusing to alter your communication style to win over others could prove to be hazardous.

With just 135 employees, staffing agency Winter, Wyman in Boston is limited when it comes to employee benefits, says Michelle Roccia, senior VP of corporate organizational development. So it offers the standard medical and dental insurance, and then managers come up with “soft benefits” to keep employees happy and make the organization attractive to applicants.

Nothing irks like jerks at work.  But some workplace behavior goes beyond being merely annoying.  When the actions of “challenging” personality types land you in court, these workers become a liability – in every sense of the word.