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Leadership Skills

Don’t just be a boss — be a leader. Maximize your leadership skills in the five most crucial areas: decision making, executive coaching, leadership training, strategic management and understanding your leadership style.

Situational leadership changes depending on the type of leadership (direction and support) each of your employee’s needs. Emotional leadership is based more on the theory of emotional intelligences and relates to the situation at hand.
Access more articles, tools and advice on maximizing your leadership skills.

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In the never-ending quest for who is really developing raw talent, Fortune magazine, along with HR consulting firm Hewitt Associates and HR services firm RBL Group, created a system to rate the world’s largest companies. In choosing their top 25 firms, judges found that the best organizations go beyond the basics in developing strong leaders and come up with new ways to test employees.

We never saw this coming: scholars studying the business model of the Grateful Dead. But a handful of fans did. Emerging from their archives is a portrait of visionaries in what’s now called customer value, social networking and strategic planning. Here’s how the Dead pioneered business practices embraced much, much later by corporate America.

Strategic planning has always accounted for changing circumstances. But leaders have now shifted their planning habits to allow for on-the-fly adjustments. For example, Office Depot began updating its annual budget monthly at the start of 2009. “This downturn has changed the way we will think about our business,” says Steve Odland, Office Depot’s chairman and chief executive.

While it's normal to talk to your boss differently than you talk to everyone else, there’s a fine line between sounding deferential and fawning like a lamb.
In a recent group coaching session, we were talking about the challenge of delegating actions and decisions to your team while still keeping yourself informed of things that could put either your organization or career at risk. Here are some of the ideas we came up with on that front:

Your employee handbook can be a helpful reference providing needed information, or it can turn into a weapon that employees and their attorneys can use against you in court. The choice is yours. Follow these four steps to make sure your handbook works for you, not against you.

When it comes to sex-based stereotyping, some industries are more resistant to change than others. The “company culture” may be a bastion of outdated beliefs about what women can and cannot do. Decision-makers may not even fully understand that their preferences for hiring employees of one gender can create liability. If that’s the case where you work, you may want to use the following case to explore that corporate culture—and then push to change it.

How can you increase employee health and decrease health costs? Many of America’s best companies have found that a few best practices do a remarkably good job of improving employee health and controlling health care expenses.
A statewide leadership program in Kansas is training people how to get things done. Bob Sage is a case in point. Promoted to police chief of Rose Hill in 2002, he wanted to learn new ways to teach and lead. “Cops are alpha males, and everyone is trying to be leader of the pack,” he says. “You tend to have a real dominant personality.” The Kansas Community Leadership Initiative taught him different ways people learn and various approaches to lead them.
Among the many pitfalls for risk-takers are fear and overconfidence.
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