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Leadership Skills

Don’t just be a boss — be a leader. Maximize your leadership skills in the five most crucial areas: decision making, executive coaching, leadership training, strategic management and understanding your leadership style.

Situational leadership changes depending on the type of leadership (direction and support) each of your employee’s needs. Emotional leadership is based more on the theory of emotional intelligences and relates to the situation at hand.
Access more articles, tools and advice on maximizing your leadership skills.

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When there’s something you want at work—an assignment, a raise, acknowledgment—make better use of your time by asking yourself who has the power to help you accomplish your goals and how well you're managing those people. Apply our seven tips to leverage your skills and get what you want.

“There’s this big building in Chicago called the Sears Tower. You heard of it?” Joseph Plumeri, chief executive of Willis Group Holdings, asked graduating seniors at the College of William & Mary. That’s also the way Plumeri would tell people how he planned to rename that skyscraper the Willis Tower.

Anyone who has used a Dyson vacuum knows just how revolutionary it is. Yet its inventor, James Dyson, didn’t find fertile ground for his idea easily. His biggest mistake of all, he says now: He shopped his idea around to manufacturers. No one would license the machine because it didn't have a bag. His biggest mistake also turned out to be his most brilliant one.
People’s names are for them the most important sound in the language. Take the case of business magnate Andrew Carnegie, who by the time he was age 10 had discovered the excessive value people place on their own names.
Since my compulsion is to look at most things from a leadership angle, here are a few lessons I’ve learned so far from the practice of yoga: 1. Every day is different and is its own day. Yesterday is over. 2. Improve­ment comes incrementally, then suddenly. 3. Breathing can focus you. 4. Invest in your team and the results will follow.

These days, crisis is the new normal. “The people who are going to thrive in the future are those who can use this pressure to excel, as oxygen. People who have translated very difficult circumstances into opportunity,” says Justin Menkes, author of Better Under Pressure. What characteristics do such leaders share?

To pass the torch gracefully to Generations X and Y, boomers need to explain a few things: 1. Manners still matter. 2. Don’t reinvent the Edsel. 3. We care about spelling and grammar. 4. We need to feel valued and respected.

For a high achiever, the thought of doing a poor or even so-so job is abhorrent. That’s why so many leaders find their upward trajectory fizzle to a plateau. Rather than trying something new and risking poor performance, they lock into routine. How to get past self-imposed obstacles:

Predicted to earn more than $100 million in 2011, Lady Gaga is the latest darling of the leadership industry. Why? Because she has built a powerful brand and legions of followers by exuding charisma. A case study points out that Lady Gaga projects leadership by telling “three universal stories.”

Plan a reverse elevator pitch: Every­body knows about the 30-­second “elevator speech” aspiring employees should have on hand when riding the elevator with head honchos. But do you have a snippet ready for times you’re confined in a small space with a subordinate or a visitor?
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