Leadership Skills

Don’t just be a boss — be a leader. Maximize your leadership skills in the five most crucial areas: decision making, executive coaching, leadership training, strategic management and understanding your leadership style.

Situational leadership changes depending on the type of leadership (direction and support) each of your employee’s needs. Emotional leadership is based more on the theory of emotional intelligences and relates to the situation at hand.
Access more articles, tools and advice on maximizing your leadership skills.

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Good leaders acknowledge their limitations, then “open up themselves to others,” says leadership author and coach John Baldoni. “People want to work with a manager who knows what he can and cannot do.”

In the simplest terms, strategy is about figuring out where to play and how to win to maximize long-term value. To define your business strategy, answer these three questions:

Bob Frisch, author of  Who’s In the Room?, says decisions are typically made by the boss consulting with a small group of people—what he calls the “kitchen cabinet.” And everyone knows that when the boss makes big decisions, he turns to this close group.  Here's what's wrong with that...
Circles play a major role for any leader who strives to make ideas happen. For any like-minded professionals to function as a circle, says the founder and CEO of Behance, Scott Belsky, “there are some key success factors.”
Top executives are less powerful than they used to be. Two decades ago, American CEOs struck heroic poses on the covers of business magazines and appointed buddies to their boards. Since the Enron debacle in 2001, change has come in several ways:
Having a Plan B is what saved Bill Gantz’s pharmaceutical giant Baxter Corp. With Plan B in his back pocket, Gantz saved his company and sold it to Chiron Novartis for $720 million.
When an executive team held a strategic planning meeting and considered options, the company founder jumped up and proclaimed their ideas worthless: “The only people in this room that aren’t idiots are the engineers who graduated from Carnegie Mellon and Caltech.” That left out more than half the team.

David Ben-Gurion, founding father and first prime minister of Israel, based his leadership on prioritization. He did this for two reasons: He thought that adhering strictly to priorities was the right way to lead, and he believed the complexities of working in a coalition dictated that you couldn’t deal with even two things at once.

Nobody argues the fact that Robert McNamara was a genius. The Ford Motor Co. whiz kid who led the Pentagon into the Vietnam War, and the World Bank into unprecedented expansion, solved problems with sheer brains. But McNamara’s flaw may have been that, in a larger sense, he just didn’t “get it.”

Gauge your audience: When addressing a crowd you don’t know, quickly assess their immersion in your subject ... Distinguish style from substance ... Find a winning strategy.
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