Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

Page 8 of 146« First...789102030...Last »

Scott Cook, co-founder and chairman of Intuit, has built a huge company helping executives make decisions using his financial management software. Yet Cook frowns on financial forecasting. In fact, he requests that his employees avoid spending time forecasting the numbers relating to their unit’s sales and expenses.

When you’re not clear on what you do best, your company’s identity and marketing message get so diluted they don’t resonate with anyone. That’s why it’s important to have a clear mental picture of your ideal client.
Every business needs repeat business to remain competitive, so don’t put all your efforts into attracting new customers. Make sure you are giving lots of love to your existing customers too.
When Mattel hired Richard Dickson as general manager of its Barbie brand in 2008, the famous doll was in a lull. After hitting a high of $1.52 billion in ­Barbie sales in 2002, Mattel had struggled through a six-year decline. Dickson hit the ground running to put an end to "brand goulash."
The story of the man CNBC named one of the worst American CEOs of all time teaches a lesson in how to conduct yourself with employees.
In late 2008, Domino’s market share was plummeting. Instead of blaming collapsing sales on the nation’s economic downturn, executives chose a surprising strategy: They admitted their main product—pizza—wasn’t very good. Then Patrick Doyle took it a step further.

In theory, strategic planning sounds great: You gather top thinkers in a room and brainstorm. But for Jim Estill, former CEO of Synnex Canada and now a partner in a venture capital firm, strategic thinking requires inspiration. He finds that it doesn’t happen on demand, so he lays the groundwork and stays attuned to insights that can arise at any time.

Prioritizing your workday is easy when your job consists of a small handful of tasks. But for most of us, dozens of pressing issues jockey for our attention. Step back and assess what matters most. Treat your time as a finite resource and allocate every hour wisely.

Ask yourself the three things T. Boone Pickens does ... Beware the trappings of success ... Be aware that leadership is just as important as ever.
Sony once demonstrated the wrong way to handle a crisis.
Page 8 of 146« First...789102030...Last »