Best-Practices Leadership: FREE reports, tools, downloads and forms for Leaders & Managers! — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Business Management Daily — Business Management Daily: Free Reports on Human Resources, Employment Law, Office Management, Office Communication, Office Technology and Small Business Tax Page 71
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Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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High-performance leaders revolutionize their roles by changing the dynamic between leader and follower: Not only do they hold team members accountable for results, but they themselves expect to be held accountable by team members. Being held accountable requires a thick skin and brave employees willing to offer honest feedback.

Mike Figliuolo’s favorite part of being a tank platoon leader was taking his men on a tank gunnery exercise. But a new soldier who transferred into his platoon flouted rules, took a sloppy approach and lacked fire in the belly. No amount of yakking helped—but a 7UP did ...

John S. Barry staked his entire claim on WD-40 and the motto of keeping it simple. When he took over his father-in-law's small company—$1 million in annual sales—he made it smaller, chopping the product line to one and renaming the company after that product: WD-40. Then … no changes—for 25 years. While his strategy seems simple, it’s actually pretty savvy:

In difficult economic times like these, employers try everything they can to wring greater productivity and profits from employees and work processes. It’s not easy. There’s often resistance from employees who have grown accustomed to doing things the same way they always have. And some of the most intransigent of those employees may be your older workers—and that means potential for legal trouble.

It’s tough to manage people who hate making decisions. Your patience may wane as these worrywarts skirt issues.

Resistance to change is one of the hardest things to face, and follow-through one of the hardest things to do. It’s easy to become defensive about changes—you risk running off track, rolling over skeptics, losing goodwill or ignoring red flags. To manage resistance, follow these steps:

The first time Lloyd C. Blankfein, chief executive of Goldman Sachs, was put in charge of something—the foreign exchange business—the business started losing money right away. Even by the standards of the day, it wasn’t much money. But it meant a lot to Blankfein. Nervous as hell, he went to his boss ...

Leslie Muma once read, “Ethics are not taught. They’re caught.” He applied that insight to his leadership.

Think you might have what it takes to lead—whether it’s your admin team or a committee of volunteers? Take this quiz from CareerBuilder.com to rate your skill level. Ask a trusted peer to complete it and assess your skill as well.

When A. Barry Rand, now chief of AARP, was chairman and CEO of Avis back in 1999, “I went in there with a bias. I was tired of seeing the motto, ‘We’re second and we try harder.’ I intended to change it." What stopped him?

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