Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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Bruce Halle’s competitors keep expanding their service and product offerings to capture a bigger chunk of car owners’ expenditures. Why does Halle resist? Because his strategy is to address what the consumer is actually buying.

During Steve Ballmer’s 13 years as Micro­­soft’s CEO, the company’s revenues tripled and its profits doubled. But the man who replaced Bill Gates also took some criticism.
Innovation usually starts with the seed of a simple idea. The challenge is to nurture that seed and let it grow into a product or service—without over­­complicating its initial simplicity.
Executives need to understand five key aspects of social media.
Astronaut Chris Hadfield describes the careful planning he used to become the space station’s commander—the forward thinking summed up in this mantra for pilots: “What’s the next thing that’s going to kill me?”
Your success as a leader largely depends on knowing which decisions to delegate and which ones to make yourself. There are three types of decisions that only you—as the leader—must make.
During Facebook’s meteoric rise from startup to global giant, founder Mark Zuckerberg sought to preserve the company’s innovative culture. He achieved this by embracing what he calls “The Hacker Way.”
Drew Greenblatt knew that Marlin Steel could not survive Chinese competitors. The Baltimore firm was struggling to stay afloat in 2003 when a fateful call changed everything.

Jack Dorsey, co-founder of Twitter and boss of his other startup, Square, lets anybody accept credit card payments through a little square swiper that attaches to a smartphone. It now processes $15 billion in transactions a year, up from $5 billion in April 2012.

Innovation isn’t about randomly tossing new products into the marketplace and seeing what sticks. The key is to first understand market needs and then develop solutions to meet them.
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