Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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In difficult economic times like these, employers try everything they can to wring greater productivity and profits from employees and work processes. It’s not easy. There’s often resistance from employees who have grown accustomed to doing things the same way they always have. And some of the most intransigent of those employees may be your older workers—and that means potential for legal trouble.

It’s tough to manage people who hate making decisions. Your patience may wane as these worrywarts skirt issues.

Resistance to change is one of the hardest things to face, and follow-through one of the hardest things to do. It’s easy to become defensive about changes—you risk running off track, rolling over skeptics, losing goodwill or ignoring red flags. To manage resistance, follow these steps:

The first time Lloyd C. Blankfein, chief executive of Goldman Sachs, was put in charge of something—the foreign exchange business—the business started losing money right away. Even by the standards of the day, it wasn’t much money. But it meant a lot to Blankfein. Nervous as hell, he went to his boss ...

Leslie Muma once read, “Ethics are not taught. They’re caught.” He applied that insight to his leadership.

Think you might have what it takes to lead—whether it’s your admin team or a committee of volunteers? Take this quiz from CareerBuilder.com to rate your skill level. Ask a trusted peer to complete it and assess your skill as well.

When A. Barry Rand, now chief of AARP, was chairman and CEO of Avis back in 1999, “I went in there with a bias. I was tired of seeing the motto, ‘We’re second and we try harder.’ I intended to change it." What stopped him?

Not every employee who earns a promotion will be successful at the new job. While you certainly want to do everything possible to allow the employee to thrive in the new assignment, you’ve also got to be practical. When you conduct those initial performance reviews, consider the possibility that the employee will ultimately fail. Here’s how to encourage success, but plan for potential failure:

What leadership needs is a return to character, says John C. Bogle in his best-selling book Enough. “We’ll be better human beings and achieve greater things if we challenge ourselves to pursue careers that create value for our society—with personal wealth not as a goal, but as the by-product, " writes Bogle, founder of the Vanguard Mutual Fund Group.

Legendary football coach Bill Walsh remembers that quarterbacks Joe Montana and Steve Young came to the San Francisco 49ers with supremely high expectations of themselves. Walsh let them know he thought they could do more than anything. The best way to do that with your own team, he says, is to use the four most powerful words:

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