Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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The waning days of this recession pose three particular problems: absentee leadership, changing cultures and underperforming employees. Here are three solutions, adapted from “Leading during a downturn”:

Nobody said managing poor performers would be easy. So don’t manage them. Try these stranger-than-fiction methods of the truly cowardly. Example: Try "team-building." Instead of working one-on-one with the source of trouble, drag the whole group into “team-building” in hopes that your poor performer will improve.

The most important thing about John Paul DeJoria is his resemblance to the hero in a Grimm fairy tale: “The Boy Who Knew No Fear.” With a net worth today estimated at $2.5 billion, the founder of the Paul Mitchell line of hair products and Patrón ultra-premium tequila started out selling encyclopedias door-to-door ...

More than 400,000 U.S. citizens retire or separate from the military every year—and most of them look for jobs when they do. Companies such as Union Pacific Railroad, GE and Home Depot actively recruit veterans. Your organization could probably benefit from hiring military veterans. To attract them, align your recruiting and employee benefits with their needs.

Because Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli was already almost 80 years old when he became pope in 1958, people expected him to be more of a caretaker than an innovator. But, as Pope John XXIII, Roncalli initiated one of the most sweeping eras of change in the Catholic Church since the Reformation. He did it by delegating power to those outside the Vatican walls.

Lauretta Hannon dithered around in safe jobs for nearly 20 years before taking the plunge in the career she really wanted, as a writer. Hanging onto the security of a steady paycheck is a fear that’s hard to overcome, she rationalized. She knows that life is full of losses, but she also knows that every living creature gets about 2 billion heartbeats, so we need to make the most of them.

You’d think it would have been easy for Miami Subway franchise owner Stuart Frankel to win everyone over to the $5 Footlong, right? Not so fast, my friends. Even though he was raking in the dough, Frankel had to work hard to convince the top brass at Subway that the $5 Footlong was the way to go. Here are five lessons for anyone who is trying to convince senior leadership to take a good idea and run with it.

Blogger Mike Figliuolo says this story is about empowering your employees. We think it’s more than that, but you decide: On a Friday this fall, Figliuolo saw a bright star and a black hole of leadership. Both of the actual leaders were away, so these performances came from their surrogates ...

Setting high standards for yourself is good, but here’s how to monitor your level of expectations so you’ll be tough but fair:

Everyone knows that Ben Franklin was an inventor and a statesman. Not everyone knows that he was an innovative farmer. When Franklin tried to persuade his neighbors one spring to spread plaster among their seeds to yield a better crop, the neighbors scoffed. Then, he sent them a message ...

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