Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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Sometimes it’s not clear how cross-team projects should proceed. Follow these guidelines for accomplishing as a group what individuals can’t do alone.

If you’ve been a fan of Executive Leadership, you know that leadership lessons may come from anywhere. Steve Cody, a public relations consultant who blogs as The Repman, says he’s learned five things about leadership from practicing stand-up comedy.

Pay attention to how you sound in response to being questioned or contradicted. If your people get the slightest whiff that agreement is what you prefer, that’s what you’ll get. To fight that possibility, take these steps:

ExecTweets, twitter feed of top business executives and IT pros, offers 20 ways businesses are using Twitter. The list, compiled by BusinessWeek, highlights big and small firms. United Linen, for example, used Twitter during a blizzard to let customers know when their fresh linens would arrive.

The California Department of Parks and Recreation recently settled a sexual harassment lawsuit brought in August of 2008 by a park ranger who argued that she was harassed and experienced gender and sexual-orientation discrimination during the six years she worked at San Onofre and San Clemente State Beaches.

Hold more productive, inspiring meetings by stealing a rule from Google’s playbook ... Squeeze breathing room into your day by scheduling meetings for 50 minutes rather than 60 ... Improve your team’s performance with this exercise ... Use these seven words more often in 2010.

Whether a group is dividing a restaurant bill or working on a shared budget, the more cooperative the group is, the more likely it can rise above a challenge. It helps a leader to understand, then, why some groups cooperate more than others.

Leading is easier than not leading, says Eric Greitens, Navy SEAL, 12-time marathoner, college professor, boxer, White House fellow and humanitarian. The combat veteran used his combat pay and a few vets to launch The Mission Continues, which trains wounded service members for leadership. More than 30 vets have been through the program. Greitens’ goal: 100 wounded or disabled vets as fellows this year.

There’s good reason why 40% of executives describe themselves as introverts. From discount broker Charles Schwab to Avon chief executive Andrea Jung, “innies” possess these five traits of quiet leadership:

With workplace budgets still tight, recession-weary employees need a morale booster now more than ever. It's time to use a little creativity to reward workers—without breaking the bank.

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