Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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Hold more productive, inspiring meetings by stealing a rule from Google’s playbook ... Squeeze breathing room into your day by scheduling meetings for 50 minutes rather than 60 ... Improve your team’s performance with this exercise ... Use these seven words more often in 2010.

Whether a group is dividing a restaurant bill or working on a shared budget, the more cooperative the group is, the more likely it can rise above a challenge. It helps a leader to understand, then, why some groups cooperate more than others.

Leading is easier than not leading, says Eric Greitens, Navy SEAL, 12-time marathoner, college professor, boxer, White House fellow and humanitarian. The combat veteran used his combat pay and a few vets to launch The Mission Continues, which trains wounded service members for leadership. More than 30 vets have been through the program. Greitens’ goal: 100 wounded or disabled vets as fellows this year.

There’s good reason why 40% of executives describe themselves as introverts. From discount broker Charles Schwab to Avon chief executive Andrea Jung, “innies” possess these five traits of quiet leadership:

With workplace budgets still tight, recession-weary employees need a morale booster now more than ever. It's time to use a little creativity to reward workers—without breaking the bank.

Facebook and Twitter may be getting all the attention, but you still need to pay attention to LinkedIn. LinkedIn is important precisely because it is so stodgy and predictable as a business tool. Here’s how to work it:

He didn’t invent the practice of “platooning” players in baseball, but Casey Stengel honed it to the point that, under his 12-year leadership, the New York Yankees won 10 American League championships and seven World Series. Before Stengel took over the Yankees in 1949, most managers played a set lineup day in and day out.

What connects Nobel-Prize winning economist Paul Samuelson and NBA championship coach Phil Jackson? Fair question. Both became experts in their chosen fields and benefited from the teachings of others. They both, in turn, dedicated significant portions of their careers to refining what they learned and then passing those lessons on to others.

You may be using Twitter.com already. If not, it’s worth taking a second look. Why? Because savvy businesses are using the tool to do some of what you do already—smooth out the information flow between leadership and everyone else. Here's how Twitter can help you on the job:

Jerry Galison struck gold twice—not by great new ideas or luck alone but because of careful setup and follow-through. Galison/Mudpuppy hit the Inc. 500, an index for fast-growing businesses, in 1989 and the Inc. 5000 two decades later.

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