Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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How are companies feeling about the future? A recent McKinsey survey reports executives are feeling positive about their companies’ ability to rebound: 74% of respondents say they expect companies’ profits to rise over the next 12 months.

To most Americans, King George III was a tyrant. In reality, he was a relatively kind and generous leader who was not responsible for the laws that drove the colonists to revolt. Parliament was. George even offered the Americans full autonomy under the British crown ...

Unless you have a god or goddess willing to intervene on your behalf, it’s never smart to let revenge drive your decisions. Consider the story of Odysseus, who succumbs to anger and slays many of his wife's suitors. Their families revolt against him and only an intervention from the goddess Athena saves him.

Don’t be surprised if the new college grads who interview for jobs with your organization this summer tell you they’re looking for an employer that gives back to the community. Employee volunteer programs are morphing from a “nice-to-have” benefit to an expectation among employees and recruits—and it’s happening quickly. Here are five tips for starting a volunteer program:

Policymakers can learn plenty about health care from Delos Cosgrove, CEO of the Cleveland Clinic, a hospital consistently ranked as one of the best in the world. Business leaders also can learn from the longtime surgeon who walks the talk on diet and exercise and took a crash course in management to transition to CEO. Here are a few of Cosgrove’s secrets:

In some ways, David Atkins was under more pressure than anybody at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, and he’s not even an athlete. As executive producer of the opening ceremony, Atkins had a tough act to follow: the 2008 Olympic ceremonies in China. Yet he succeeded with a budget 30% less by using less manpower and relying on tech-driven illusion.

On April 4, 1968, presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy stepped to the microphone in a poor neighborhood in Indianapolis and stunned the crowd with the news that the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. had been shot and killed. The sheriff had tried to persuade Kennedy to cancel his appearance, saying it was too dangerous to address an African-American crowd. Kennedy refused.

Richard Nixon suffered the stigma of being the only U.S. president forced to resign, and his leadership suffered greatly under the weight of Watergate. But the disgraced president did fire off one flare of good leadership as his administration crashed. Ironically, it ensured the end of his presidency.

Learn how to counsel, regroup and gain strength from each other after a trying event.
You have heard all the general advice and theories about getting “a seat at the table.” But what does it take to jump the fence from your administrative role and be seen as a true leader in the company? The HR Specialist newsletter posed the following question to three of the leading HR thought leaders in America today: “What makes an HR professional an indispensable leader in an organization?” Their answers pointed to the following 5 actions:
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