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Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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GE chairman and chief executive Jeffrey Immelt is famously at ease. Occasionally, he simply issues an order. When done in moderation, Immelt says, leadership by fiat can drive change.

Businesses in the developing world traditionally have been obsessed with seniority, and ambitious young people have been equally obsessed with finding paths to corporate seniority. Not anymore.
A time machine interview with the resourceful and fearless Clara Barton, who was the first female clerk at the U.S. Patent Office. She ultimately founded the American Red Cross, serving as its first president.
Change can prove threatening to em­­ployees. They might view the near future as an unwelcome disruption to their familiar routine. To pry open their minds, instruct your team to pretend the future has already occurred.
When The Wall Street Journal interviewed Denise Morrison in 2007, she was president of Campbell USA. Senior executives usually downplay their ambitions, but Morrison boldly told the re­­porter that she wanted to become CEO of a large corporation. In 2011, she be­came Campbell's CEO.
Setting goals is more art than science. You want people to give full effort to attain ambitious goals without making the targets so outlandish that employees lose hope. To strike that balance, think in terms of PUSH goals: passionate, urgent, specific, hairy.
You know that kind of day when you accomplish a lot—but not one thing you planned? Here are some ways to avoid detours.
"Great leadership is not a solo act," says Robert Vanourek, chairman emeritus of the Vail Leadership Institute and co-author of Triple Crown Leadership. "It's a group performance. You need to connect through the heart to lead effectively." 
The Associated Press placed Babe Didrikson Zaharias in the Top 10 athletes of the 20th century. "The formula for success is simple," she said. "Practice and concentration, then more practice and more concentration."
Some see a project’s fruition as the end. Not leaders—including Henry Ford.
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