Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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Job-search site Indeed.com analyzed millions of job listings on its site and found that these are the top 10 professional attributes most often found in employers’ job postings:
Encourage your people to take risks? The very idea is enough to make many CEOs shudder. Doug Stern, CEO of United Media, follows an explicit process anytime he faces a new, risky project. He uses the same tactics to help his team evaluate risks and build its confidence about confronting the unknown:

The entrepreneurial ego is an interesting thing. It takes a significant amount of self-confidence to be a founder and assume the risk required to build a successful business. While relying on your ego in the early growth stages of your business may be critical, at some point, an entrepreneur is well served to rely more on evidence than ego.

It’s not too late to get your team’s momentum going, so they’re invigorated by 2011's new year's goals. Here are 10 steps blogger Terry Starbucker recommends:

As a management professor at Stanford, Robert Sutton heard many tales of woe that led to his business best-seller, The No Asshole Rule, whose thesis was simple: Don’t hire jerks. Beyond jerkdom, however, Sutton has a few suggestions about how to behave and how not to behave as a leader:

With 18 minutes, 20 sticks of spaghetti, a yard of tape, a yard of string and one marshmallow, Tom Wujec believes he can tell you how innovative any team is. Here’s how:

Most Americans first became aware of former U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Thad Allen when he led the disaster response to Hurricane Katrina following the dismissal of FEMA director Michael Brown. Leading in a crisis situation is tough and Admiral Allen leaves us with 3 leadership lessons we can all take away.
If you’re the boss, it’s worth thinking about what kind of weather system you’re creating. Warm front or cold front? Sunny and pleasant or stormy and blustery? How do these weather systems affect the team’s results? If you’re interested in becoming a more effective leadership meteorologist, here are a few things to pay attention to:
Think of the workplace as rugby, where each person has value. On the rugby field, your physical safety depends on your teammates. In that sense, every member of a team has value and could be the one to save your hide. That’s a lesson learned by Andrew Cosslett, CEO of InterContinental Hotels Group, over the 25 years he played the game.

Retail managers are generally responsible for everything that happens in their stores. But they often spend most of their time doing the same work that hourly employees do. Even so, they may qualify as exempt employees under the FLSA. It’s the quality of the management work they do that counts, not the number of hours they spend doing it.

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