Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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Courage is the first of human qualities because it is the quality that guarantees all the others, said Winston Churchill, who epitomizes what leadership is all about.

Even in his youth, Ulysses S. Grant picked his battles. Arriving at West Point to study, he decided against arguing with the adjutant about his own name (actually Hiram Ulysses) and accepted the name given to him in a mix-up, realizing it would serve him better than the initials H.U.G.

Through force, grit and bombast—and being one with his team—Adm. William “Bull” Halsey secured a decisive naval victory at Guadalcanal and a turning point in the South Pacific during World War II.

Forget the first-mover advantage. Arriv­ing late to the game is much more criti­cal to creating a successful product or business, says Malcolm Gladwell, author of The Tipping Point and Blink. Even the much-applauded Google co-founders, Sergey Brin and Larry Page, aren’t “breakthrough guys,” says Gladwell. “They’re tweakers.”

What do you do after you've already created the world’s largest social network? Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes saw a community of people wanting to help victims of natural disasters. His vision—call it Philanthropy 2.0—was to speed the pace of positive global change. So he created an online conduit for people to identify social causes and build relationships.

Under Brad Brinegar’s tenure as chairman and CEO, McKinney has had one of the best new-business records in the advertising agency industry. Before coming to McKinney in 2002, Brinegar served as CEO of Leo Burnett USA, the world’s second largest advertising agency office. We asked Brinegar: What is the importance and the role of innovation in today’s global economic environment?

Nokia went from being the undisputed king of cell phones to a company doing nearly everything wrong. Nearly a year ago, CEO Stephen Elop came on board to turn around the company. His strategy:

When Wright L. Lassiter III came on board as CEO of the Alameda County Medical Center, and its flagship, Highland Hospital, it was losing millions of dollars each year. What followed was a turnaround so successful it now serves as a model worth emulating.

Cartoon creator and producer Chuck Jones credits his success to a lack of constant supervision early on and his father’s string of business failures. Every time his father launched a business, he’d print new stationery and pencils. Using his cast-offs, Jones drew and drew. Here are his six success tips.

At Lush, happy people make happy soap, literally—the handcrafted cosmetics are fresh, free of preservatives and made with ingredients not tested on animals. The lesson of how Lush cosmetics grew from one small store to a worldwide chain in 44 countries holds valuable insights for any small business in its growth stage.
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