Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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If you think your customers exist solely to “buy your stuff,” you’re missing a huge part of the picture. Instead of using your company’s profits to promote your company, wouldn’t it be more effective if you let the customers themselves drive your sales and marketing efforts and fuel your growth?

When something fails, follow these steps: 1. Look in the mirror. 2. Go right back to work. 3. Communicate directly. 4. Seek other leaders on the team. 5. Make necessary changes.

Our founding fathers paid dearly for their convictions, but as anthropologist Margaret Mead once said: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”

When Maestro Wolfgang Heinzel stands before the Merck Orchestra, he may look like an authoritarian leader, commanding musicians from his podium. But Heinzel doesn’t actually know how to play the instruments himself—“in the same way a leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job,” says Jon Chilingerian. Here is what maestros—and good leaders—understand.

If you’re a keen observer with sharp sensory perceptions, then you’re what Harvard psychology professor Ellen Langer calls “a mindful leader.” To increase your mindfulness, watch how ­others interact.
“Solopreneur” is the latest moniker for peo­­ple developing personal brands. And yes, one person may have several brands, such as life coach/marketer/media consultant.

Allison Evanow was sleeping one summer night when it hit her. She woke up next morning, turned to her husband and said, “I have this crazy idea.” Already working in the spirits industry, Evanow had noticed a “sophisticated and energized cocktail movement” ...

In 1940, Britain was on the verge of surrender. Winston Churchill exhorted the public to stay the course. “It is in adversity that British qualities shine the brightest.”
Crocs, a global apparel and accessories company that began as a shoemaker, has grown quickly in recent years. Why? "We’ve be­­come an $850 million global business by putting our customers first," says John McCarvel, president and chief executive.
Born into a life of privilege in New York City in 1897, Margaret Rudkin learned to bake bread from her Irish grandmother. Marrying a broker, she began a life in high society. Then two calamities hit: the Depression and an accident that laid up her husband for months. Here's how Rudkin proved it's possible to bounce back from adversity to achieve success.
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