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Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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As World War II came to an end, Secretary of State George Marshall told the State Department’s director of policy planning, George Kennan, to get his team together and come up with an economic relief plan for Europe. Marshall didn’t become bogged down in telling Kennan how to do his job. But he did offer “two deeply serious and unforgettable words,” says Kennan. “Avoid trivia.”

Nancy McKinstry, CEO of the multinational publisher Wolters Kluwer, describes herself as an analytical person. She also calls herself an “insider-outsider” who knows her company thoroughly from the inside but also is an outsider—she became its first non-Dutch CEO and the first woman to lead it. She says she likes hiring people who have overcome adversity because ...

Job descriptions are the cornerstone of communication between managers and their employees. After all, it's hard for supervisors to measure job effectiveness during performance reviews unless they and the employee both know what's expected. Here's how to do job descriptions right.

The pace of change seems to grow more urgent every year. Some see it as an attribute of leadership in the 21st century—right up there with judgment and courage. Consider, then, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, who spread the speed creed 70 years before it was cool.

Why did the industrial revolution begin in England, instead of, say, France or Germany? Two economists offer an explanation. They say the reason is Britain had more “tweakers”—skilled engineers and artisans who refined the signature inventions of the industrial age.

How does a top executive like Bob Pozen get it all done? Pozen has been a top dog at Fidelity and MFS Investment Man­age­ment, as well as an attorney, law school professor, business school professor and author. His tips for extreme productivity:

After the Penn State scandal, the topic of “values” was rampant. What are Penn State’s values, and how are students and staff held accountable for them?

Once upon a time, a company imagined a future where music, video and books were all digital, instantly available through a hand-held gadget. It saw itself as a big seller of that digital content. No, we’re not talking about Apple, but about Barnes & Noble.

You might have heard of foursquare, the location-based social media tool. But if you’re not using it for business, you’re missing out on a powerful marketing and engagement tool that can help any business—large or small—tell its brand story to a new category of consumer.

We look in mirrors every day. They give us a reflection of ourselves. But what about our inner selves—our attitudes and thoughts? How often do we look there? True leaders look inward every day and take stock of themselves. As simple as it sounds, it’s the step most overlooked by managers in their journey to becoming leaders ...

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