Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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When market dynamics change, how quickly can you respond? Here are three steps for pivoting faster than the competition: 1. Speed up your rhythm. 2. Build scenarios. 3. Monitor.
Leading from the top down no longer makes sense in the rapidly changing workplace. The most effective management style includes meaningful, ongoing collaboration between managers and employees.
By fostering positive mindsets, a leader can boost productivity, creativity, engagement—just about every performance measure, according to research. Yet “happiness” isn’t well understood as a performance driver.
What attribute is most needed by ­leaders today? “Realistic optimism,” according to Justin Menkes, an expert in evaluating C-suite executives and author of Better Under Pressure.

The 100-plus senior managers who attend the annual meeting of nationwide retirement community firm Aegis Living talk about everything except business. Instead, they listen to inspirational speakers and celebrities, whose iden­tities are not revealed until the guests are in­­tro­­duced.

The former president of South Africa who ended apartheid there, Nelson Mandela, has an African first name, Rolihlahla, which translates literally as “pulling down a tree branch.” What that actually means is “troublemaker.” Mandela’s life means many more things: warrior, activist and statesman. Here are his rules of leadership.

The difference between leaders and great leaders boils down to three things: 1. The magnitude of their impact 2. The length of their impact. 3. The number of followers.

Many leaders today are fearful and anxious, says Meg Wheatley, an expert on innovative leadership. Their fear and uncertainty deprives them of the energy and enthusiasm they need to keep going. Yet perseverance is precisely what they need. That, and wilderness survival skills.

"Most of the things in your room right now will eventually become garbage." That’s the simple idea that in 2001 drove Tom Szaky to launch Terracycle, a company that collects waste and converts it into new products. He says, "Right now is the time for innovation." Skittles wrappers become a kite; Honest Tea containers become a laptop case ...
On June 4, 1940, Winston Churchill delivered a speech over the radio, as families all over England gathered around to listen. From Churchill, leaders can learn how to give others hope in a time of hardship or fear.
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