Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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We’re all subject to lapses that make us look unprofessional. Here are seven reminders of what to avoid.
When you appear strong and confident, gaining influence is a much easier job. And projecting a powerful image may not require more than a few tweaks to how you act.

Want to gain customer input as you design a product? Some managers convene focus groups to find out what customers want. Not so fast, says Bernhard Schroeder, a San Diego-based marketing expert. He thinks focus groups are overrated.

Stepping into a new leadership position? The first few weeks on the job can have a huge impact on just how much faith your employees and your boss have in your ability to handle your new gig. Follow this advice to start off on the right track.

1. Find your superpower. It’s the one thing that you’re truly amazing at. 2. Know your weakness so you can hire people who complement your skills ...

From 1982 to 1987, John Hewitt joined forces with Mel Jackson to provide tax-preparation services in southern Virginia. By 1988, they decided to expand into North Carolina. They soon learned that they couldn’t keep the name of their firm, Mel Jackson Tax Service, because a tax firm with a similar name already existed in North Carolina. This didn’t sit well with John Hewitt, the company’s owner ...

Richard Anderson, CEO of Delta Air Lines, applies certain rules to each work­­day. He attributes his success largely to his ability to follow these rules to operate more productively, gain insight and make smarter decisions.

Some executives equate leading with infallibility. They assume that they must project an intimidating I-know-­everything superiority to earn the respect of their team. Yet attempting to know it all is an exercise in futility.

One of the healthiest signs of a strong organizational culture involves employees’ attitudes. Do they confront challenges with gusto? Or do they seem defeated from the start? When employees exhibit these four attitudes, it’s usually a good sign of a “yes we can” culture.
Take your next step using David Allen’s two-minute rule ... Reconsider voice mail ... Exercise gratitude.
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