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Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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In his latest book, management thinker Jim Collins tried to get at how com­panies thrive amid chaos. Some winners cut against common wisdom.

Being an effective manager means confronting those “challenging” employees who, while typically good at their jobs, too often display unprofessional or downright obnoxious behavior. The best way to tackle such problems is to meet with employees right when you spot the problem behavior. Follow these guidelines, which have the side benefit of protecting the organization from employee claims that they weren’t treated fairly.

While fans of former Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow will likely vehemently disagree, I’d have to put John Elway in the running for manager of the year. And not just NFL manager of the year … anybody’s manager of the year.
When market dynamics change, how quickly can you respond? Here are three steps for pivoting faster than the competition: 1. Speed up your rhythm. 2. Build scenarios. 3. Monitor.
Leading from the top down no longer makes sense in the rapidly changing workplace. The most effective management style includes meaningful, ongoing collaboration between managers and employees.
By fostering positive mindsets, a leader can boost productivity, creativity, engagement—just about every performance measure, according to research. Yet “happiness” isn’t well understood as a performance driver.
What attribute is most needed by ­leaders today? “Realistic optimism,” according to Justin Menkes, an expert in evaluating C-suite executives and author of Better Under Pressure.

The 100-plus senior managers who attend the annual meeting of nationwide retirement community firm Aegis Living talk about everything except business. Instead, they listen to inspirational speakers and celebrities, whose iden­tities are not revealed until the guests are in­­tro­­duced.

The former president of South Africa who ended apartheid there, Nelson Mandela, has an African first name, Rolihlahla, which translates literally as “pulling down a tree branch.” What that actually means is “troublemaker.” Mandela’s life means many more things: warrior, activist and statesman. Here are his rules of leadership.

The difference between leaders and great leaders boils down to three things: 1. The magnitude of their impact 2. The length of their impact. 3. The number of followers.

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