Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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When Jeffrey Hayzlett took over as Kodak’s chief marketing officer, he didn’t know much about the founding father of the company, George Eastman. What he learned gradually, by raiding the archives and reading everything that Eastman had written, was that Eastman had been a change agent.

Smithfield Foods, a pork-packing plant, experienced the Great Recession like everyone else. “I thought the hole we were digging was so deep we should go into the swimming pool business,” says CEO Larry Pope. Here’s how Pope turned things around.
“Managing is work,” said Earl Weaver, legendary manager of the Baltimore Orioles baseball club, who died early this year, leaving behind some thoughts on leadership. “It’s constant decisions of whose feelings you want to hurt all the time.”
A few hours after you hear a presentation, ask yourself, “What do I remember?” If you recall anything, it will probably be a story. No matter how well a speaker serves up data, few listeners will remember it. But succinct stories lodge themselves in listeners’ brains.
Alan Wurtzel, who helped turn Circuit City into a great company, wanted to understand why it collapsed. Here's his assessment of its mistakes.
Entrepreneurs tend to be “ready, fire, aim” people. “We often don’t make the best planners. We are action-oriented people,” says Bill McBean, author of The Facts of Business Life. That’s why it’s vital to step off the day-to-day treadmill and plan for your company’s growth.

You’ve heard about the new generation of “digital natives”—young people born after 1989 who know only a digital world. For the rest of us, the lesson is clear: We need to become digital leaders.

In 2006, kids were flocking to MySpace, so naturally, NBC News thought it could jump on the social media bandwagon to help improve education. Epic failure ...

An experienced CFO shares his knowledge on the basics of organizing and presenting data. Here are a few of what he calls the “deadly sins” of sharing financials.

Joseph Duveen, a prominent British art dealer in the early 20th century, wanted to win Andrew Mellon as a client. Rather than simply contact the American banker and invite him to buy art, Duveen preferred to proceed in carefully plotted steps.
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