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Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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Robert Johnson wanted to own a sports franchise. The founder and chief executive of Black Entertainment Television (BET) bid on a National Basketball Association (NBA) expansion team and won, largely because he’s loaded: He sold his BET for $3 billion.
Most executives don’t know how to subjugate their egos to a higher cause, says leadership guru Don Schmincke.
Nothing is more infuriating (and costly) than a chronically absent employee.
Rudy Giuliani has a pet name for greed in the corporate world: “the pig factor.”
For you to lead in a competitive environment, you have to choose the best people, have the best information and recognize and support the best ideas.
Left unchecked, the same qualities that drive leaders to the top will assure their downfall. To survive at that altitude, you have to throw off certain dangerous habits.
Issue: You probably track several HR-related numbers, but are you sure you're tracking the right ones? Benefit: By tracking the right metrics, you enhance your perception as a strategic partner. ...
We all know what a pyramid looks like: the higher it goes, the narrower it gets. Many of us let our path to leadership follow that pattern. 
The founding father not only ramped up his farming operation phenomenally over five years (his annual grain production alone grew from 257 bushels to 6,241), but he also built entirely new enterprises, including fisheries and a distillery.
  Thirty years ago, many biologists saw higher primates, including humans, as natural-born “killer apes,” their lives defined by competition, territoriality and dominance.
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