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Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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Children of business owners are two to three times more likely than others to become business owners themselves, according to a new study promoted in the U.S. Small Business Administration's newsletter.

So, you're thinking about creating a program to help settle employee conflicts in-house. That's smart; a successful alternative dispute-resolution (ADR) program lets you identify and address problems while they're still manageable ...
THE LAW. While law doesn't directly regulate employee handbooks, they are extremely important legal tools. A handbook documents your policies, builds trust ...
Rick managed two engineers with the technical know-how to move up in the firm. But all their peers disliked them.
When your boss asks for an update on a project that you and your employees are working on, reinforce your leadership with a good answer.
A few days after Sept. 11, I saw a TV interview with Howard Lutnick, the CEO of Cantor Fitzgerald. The guy was distraught—crying and burying his head in his hands.
Working Smart readers know about leadership. They’ve learned how to share a vision and motivate their troops to carry it out. But on Sept. 11 some managers in the World Trade Center redefined leadership.
If you sense you’re taken for granted, don’t talk about it. Do something!
The size of the Sept. 11 attacks magnified the impact that a disaster can have on a workplace, thousands attempting to evacuate ...
“We use the names of the Old Testament characters Cain and Abel as a metaphor for the ongoing battle between cunning (Cain) and ability (Abel) in today’s workplace.”
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