Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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Ritz-Carlton President and COO Simon Cooper has a simple way of helping his people develop their leadership abilities. When someone has an idea and says “We can do it,” Cooper allows that person to lead the process, provided that he or she can develop a workable strategy.
After he’d already served as governor of New York, published more than a dozen books, served two terms as president of the United States and won the Nobel Peace Prize, Theodore Roosevelt said these words about leadership:
For a while now, General Electric’s top dogs have been studying companies they admire, like Dell and Toyota, seeing how they do things and trying to figure out exactly what propels them to the leading edge. The GE group settled on five “growth leadership traits” common to all of those top companies … and copied them, of course.
Despite last month’s Cotton Bowl loss, Mike Leach has turned Texas Tech University’s football team into a powerhouse by implementing some of the most far-fetched theories in the game’s history. Better yet, his ideas can supercharge results in any field. Here are five of his strategies:
Mastering the art of gratitude, said the stoic Roman philosopher Seneca, is the most important leadership skill. Here’s what he meant:
Vatican-based journalist John Allen spent six years observing Pope John Paul II as the pontiff went about his daily routines. Here are three leadership practices Allen noted in John Paul:
Crisis produces a state of being “on,” which a University of Michigan business researcher calls the “fundamental state of leadership.” Here are the four stages of moving from a normal work state to being “on” for a crisis:
Here are a few precepts, drawn loosely from the Lewis and Clark expedition, of maintaining a realistic optimism while leading your team into the unknown:
Learning new stuff is hard, so people look for someone to guide and support them through the chaos. If they don’t see that support, they’ll drag their feet. In response, the leader repeats the logic behind the change, pushes harder, tries pep talks, then anger and threats. Finally, his people shut down. Here are three ways to avoid that cycle so your people trust you enough to accept the change.
Many people don’t have a clue about the difference between “mission” and “vision.” In fact, most use the terms interchangeably. So, let’s take a hard look at these two words.
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