Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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Early in their careers, leaders move up quickly because they can identify problems and solve them.
Columbia Business School professor Michael Feiner remembers having a boss who would sort mail during their meetings. It made Feiner feel like an ashtray.
Sir Frank Williams began building race cars more than 30 years ago and won his first world championship in 1979. Since then, he’s won eight more world championships, and his drivers have clinched the Drivers World Championship seven times.
“I’m hard pressed to think of a trend that [Estée] Lauder started,” writes fashion insider Grace Mirabella. Nonetheless, Mirabella heaps praise on Lauder’s unparalleled cosmetics empire.

Why should somebody do your bidding?
A midlevel marketing manager recently flew to London on British Airways. The flight was to land at Heathrow Airport, but a labor dispute on the ground diverted the plane, which circled awhile, then landed at another airport, then sat on the runway, then took off again and landed at Heathrow. The delay chewed up about 90 minutes.
Painter James Rosenquist is recognized as one of the greatest American artists today, a position solidified by recent exhibitions of his work at the Guggenheim Museums in New York and Spain.
Even in conversation, Maj. Richard “Dick” Winters shows the leadership traits that made him a key player on D-day and a pivotal character in the HBO World War II series Band of Brothers. Here’s a sampling of how Winters’ careful preparation honed his leadership skills:
Most people see the good that comes of failure only months or years later. This exercise helps you conduct a “real time” assessment so you can learn from failure right away.
A. J. Wasserstein, CEO of storage and archives management company ArchivesOne, bases his success on a simple principle:
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