Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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If you are challenged with a cumbersome or outdated process within your department, what’s the best way to fix it? Undoubtedly, for expediency, you have created some workaround solutions, but there comes a point when a permanent fix is necessary. Before thinking about specific solutions, step back and do some preliminary homework. Here’s how to get started:

Few men in politics have been admired by both sides of the aisle. Former Secretary of State Colin Powell is one such man. In his memoir, It Worked for Me: In Life and Leadership, he offers up rules to live by.
Opower’s Barry Fischer leads his field by extracting and publishing insights on power consumption.
Hold on to ownership mentality ... Always watch as you listen ... Be aware that you can be too attractive.
It may be apocryphal, but it is said that at the end of the Revolutionary War, England’s King George III asked an American, Benjamin West, about George Washington’s plans.
Bell Labs was among the most innovative scientific organizations of the 20th century. The man at the helm was Mervin Kelly, a physicist who led the laboratory. Follow his lead for inventing the future.
Executives in most developed countries speak at least some English. But you might still face cultural and linguistic obstacles. Consider the case of American business owners who travel to Tokyo to meet with Japanese executives to explore a possible joint venture.
With so much information at our fingertips, it’s tempting to rely on data to make important decisions. But don’t overlook other variables. Consider the case of a big U.S. bank CEO.
Leaders need to pay close attention to their management income statement, or “natural P&L,” the cornerstone for managing any organization. Every organization is unique, so every statement needs to vary slightly, but what all good management reports have in common are characteristics that make them useful.
All growth is good. Bigger is better. All businesses must either “grow or die.” Small business owners have heard these mantras for years. But, “at best those beliefs are half-truths and at worst they’re pure fiction,” argues business professor Ed Hess.
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