Best-Practices Leadership

A leader in an organization can’t do everyone’s job. Instead of micromanaging, strong leaders use organizational leadership to coordinate, communicate, motivate and delegate among employees and team members. For comprehensive organizational effectiveness, each individual needs to be seen as a contributor, with the leader at the helm.

Most importantly, best-practices leadership involves keeping employees motivated throughout the process, adapting your scope or strategy as necessary, and developing an effective communication strategy.

Some people never make it to the other side because they’re more successful at being doers. This is a crucial point in determining if you’re going to move up the ranks.

Browse our articles, tools and advice on best-practices leadership.

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The career of Booker T. Washington began with two basic desires: an education and the means to get it. From there, all his later ideas about financial success — many of them a century ahead of their time — flowed.
As a boy, college basketball coaching legend John Wooden learned a leadership lesson from his father:
University of Southern California (USC) football coach Pete Carroll is under no delusions about the tenuous nature of his job. As well as he’s done at USC — winning consecutive national championships and producing two Heisman Trophy winners — he knows he’s just a few losing seasons away from unemployment.
If you read current books on leadership, you might believe that personality is the greatest determinant of leadership success. Only a few decades ago, though, that belief would’ve been viewed as flawed, self-centered and wrong.
Leadership guru Tom Peters doesn’t like MBA degrees. He calls them “Masters of Paper Pushing” and suggests these other degrees, instead:
Nelson Mandela spent 27 years in prison, working at hard labor in a quarry, with a floor for a bed and a bucket for a toilet. He was allowed one visitor a year — for a half-hour — one exchange of letters every six months.
People can take tough news if you deliver it honestly, appeal to their nobler sentiments and listen to yourself from their vantage point.
Has your fast trip to the top given you a slightly enlarged head? Did it leave you isolated? From this moment on, quit relying on what you already know, and start learning what you need to thrive at a higher altitude.
Sometimes, leadership seems downright simple. You plan, and you work the plan. That’s the credo of Augie Bossu, who at age 90 has taken a break as a football coach at Benedictine High School in Cleveland for the first time since Eisenhower inhabited the White House.
The Small Business Administration is offering “podcasts”— oral presentations that you can download onto an iPod or other portable mp3 player — on topics related to the launch and growth of business.
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