Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

Page 9 of 2,038« First...8910203040...Last »

Employers aren’t supposed to retaliate against employees who file wage-and-hour complaints against their employers. For quite some time now, there has been confusion over two things: first, whether the employee has to make a written complaint, and second, whether the complaint has to be made to a governmental agency like the Department of Labor. Now the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals, which covers New York employers, has settled the issue.

Lots of employees enjoy an after-work cocktail, but some jobs either attract people who are prone to more serious consumption or make them more likely abuse alcohol and drugs.
Here’s an important reminder for managers handling workers returning from medical leave who may qualify as disabled: Placing workers in a temporary job may be part of an accommodation but that doesn’t end the process.
Not every slight, indignity or inconvenience experienced in the workplace is sufficient to meet the standard set by the ADEA, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 or other state or federal law. Even so, where does one draw the line?
The long-awaited rewrite of federal rules governing overtime pay for salaried executive, administrative and professional employees took one step closer to becoming reality on May 5.
On April 29, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its unanimous decision in Mach Mining v. EEOC, a case that set new standards for challenging whether the EEOC engaged in a good-faith conciliation process before suing. In the wake of the decision, employers can expect more pre-litigation outreach from the EEOC.
Outside consultants who specialize in the tricky business of terminations can help small employers when it’s time to let go of an individual employee or implement a larger layoff. But before you act on outside advice, do make sure you provide all the relevant information to the consultant.

Employees who file discrimination complaints are protected from retaliation. When a complaint is closely followed by termination, it becomes easier for the fired employee to show the two were linked and that one caused the other. Smart employers cut this causal connection by making sure that whoever makes the termination decision wasn’t involved in the employee’s original complaint.

Recent changes to the Minnesota Whistleblower Act and the way in which Minnesota courts interpret it should put employers on watch. Late last year, the Minnesota Court of Appeals extended the statute of limitations for MWA claims from two to six years. The ruling comes on the heels of 2013 amendments to the MWA, which, plaintiffs argue, expand the scope of the statute’s coverage.
Only 11.1% of Americans belonged to a labor union in 2013, down from 20.1% in 1983 and an all-time high of 34.8% in 1954.
Page 9 of 2,038« First...8910203040...Last »