Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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Here’s a rather novel question being answered for the first time in the 5th Circuit, which has jurisdiction over Texas employers. Can the refusal to accept a request to rescind a resignation ever be an adverse em­­ployment action and retaliation for engaging in protected activity?
The EEOC has filed suit against staffing company Labor Ready Mid-Atlantic for actions occurring at its office in Washington, Pa.
When an employee returns from FMLA leave and his employer assigns him to light-duty work, that is basically an acknowledgment that the employee has a serious health condition incapacitating enough to interfere with performing an essential job function. The employer can’t later challenge that part of FMLA eligibility.
Employees who get promotions generally don’t sue their employers, but an administrative specialist for the city of Austin, Texas, has done just that.
One of the easiest ways to get in legal trouble is to discipline two employees differently for breaking the same rule.
A mining company’s refusal to accommodate an employee’s religious belief has cost it $586,860. A federal jury in Pittsburgh decided that Consol Energy violated Title VII of the Civil Rights Act when it refused an employee’s request to use an alternative method for tracking his hours.
Under Minnesota unemployment compensation law, individuals aren’t independent contractors just because the company that uses their labor says they are.

Here’s something to remember when an employee claims she has a disability that interferes with her ability to work overtime or even a full day. You can offer intermittent FMLA leave as a reasonable accommodation rather than restructuring the job or transferring the employee to another open position. Remember, the employer, not the employee, gets to pick the ADA accommodation.

Professors who teach at public institutions and have tenure are generally protected from job cuts. But under some circumstances, they still may lose their jobs.
A former professor at the University of Scranton has sued the university claiming it denied him tenure and fired him because of his Greek heritage.
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