Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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Fewer opportunities to work overtime, less workplace flexibility for employers and employees alike: That’s the likely result of the Department of Labor’s proposed rule to more than double the salary threshold that makes white-collar managers eligible for overtime pay, according to comments submitted to the DOL by the Society for Human Resource Management and WorldatWork, two prominent HR organizations.
Here are three things to look for when you want to hire people who know how to manage their time.
President Obama picked Labor Day to announce an executive order requiring federal contractors to provide paid sick leave benefits to their employees, including 300,000 workers who currently have no paid leave.
The U.S. Senate returned from its annual summer recess on Sept. 8 to face a legislative calendar dominated by debate about the nuclear arms treaty with Iran and passing a stopgap spending bill to avoid a government shutdown on Oct. 1. That has pushed a robust employment law agenda onto the back burner.
When an employer (or plan administrator) denies a request to receive an ERISA-covered benefit, it must inform the employee that he must appeal by a certain date, typically 180 days. When the 180th day falls on a weekend, those days aren’t counted.

Firing a difficult employee is hard. Luckily, there are ways you can spot problem people in the interview process, writes consultant April Starcadder. Here are some important signs to watch out for.

Let’s say a top employee refuses to work a company’s new mandated Saturday shift. His religion won’t allow it, he says, and he wants an accommodation. How you listen and react when first approached about a religious accommodation sets the tone for a quick resolution.

Q. We received our first request for a same-sex spouse to be covered under our insurance. We’re fine doing this, as long as they are actually married. (We don’t cover domestic partners.) Can we ask for proof of marriage even if we don’t ask it from opposite-sex spouses? I’d like to create a policy that says if your last name is different than your spouse you wish to cover, we need proof of marriage. Is that legal? 

The EEOC handled 6,862 charges of sexual harassment in fiscal year 2014, collecting $35 million on behalf of victims. Almost all those cases could have been prevented—here's how.

Supervisors who ignore an employee’s initial oral request for a reasonable accommodation risk exposing their employer to liability if the employee quits and sues. Never dismiss such a request out of hand.