Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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Employees who take FMLA leave are entitled to the same or an equivalent job when they return. That means that the job must be virtually identical in all aspects, including pay. If you change the pay, the reason is irrelevant—it’s an FMLA violation.

Almost every employer offers employees a handful of paid holidays. Otherwise, less than half of employers offer paid leave benefits.
Here’s a recent case that should make it clear to employers that it’s their responsibility to make sure employees aren’t sexually harassed. Simply put, you can’t tell someone going into an all-male environment that sexual harassment just happens and is the price for breaking down gender barriers.
Air Force contractor General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, based in San Diego, will pay 901 workers more than $945,000 after government auditors found the company had not paid them the prevailing wage mandated by the federal McNamara-O’Hara Service Contract Act.
A Papa John’s pizza franchisee faces jail time for his attempt to evade responsibility for paying overtime to workers at nine stores in the Bronx, N.Y.
Working overtime can be an essential job function. If disabled employees can’t work overtime, you may not have to accommodate them.
Some companies, including General Electric, have begun replacing traditional performance reviews with web- and mobile-based apps that let employees provide real-time, 360-degree feedback of one another.
One of the first cases the U.S. Supreme Court heard in its 2015-2016 term could have important implications for employers that require arbitration to settle workplace disputes.
Forty-five percent of employees who get sick with the flu believe they caught it from someone at work, according to the medical journal “Clinical Infectious Diseases.” It’s a timely reminder that influenza season will soon be upon us, and that it’s not too early to urge employees to get flu shots.
Not every disability can be accommodated in a way that enables an employee to perform the essential functions of his job. Sometimes, the disability simply can’t be accommodated. When that’s the case, you may terminate the employee. If he sues, you must be ready to show what the job’s essential functions are and that it simply isn’t possible for the disabled employee, given his specific disabilities, to perform those functions.