Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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G&K Services, which operates laundry facilities under federal contract in seven states, has agreed to pay more than $1.8 million and reform its hiring systems after the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs cited it for systemic discrimination.
With the current version of the Form I-9 set to expire on March 31, 2016, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services earlier this month announced it is seeking public comment on a newly revised “smart” version of the I-9 form. The goal: Reducing errors and preventing confusion.
Q. When, if ever, can our company legally ask an applicant about his or her religious affiliation?

To bring a case of retaliation for complaining about discrimination or harassment, employees must show that they suffered some sort of “adverse employment action” in response to their complaint. That’s easy if the employee is demoted, fired or transferred to a less desirable position. But what if the worker experiences more subtle retaliation, like having to do more work or being transferred to a potentially better position that doesn’t pan out?

An Austin. TX.-area amusement park allegedly took a developmentally disabled janitor for a ride then booted him out of his job. According to an EEOC lawsuit, the man had worked for the company satisfactorily for four years despite having suffered a traumatic brain injury as a child.
The Fair Labor Standards Act is generally a fairly straightforward law—for most of the year. But winter weather—and the delays and closures that sometimes accompany it—can make wage-and-hour compliance more difficult.
Sometimes, you realize you made a mistake with an employee. When that mistake could be fixed with a prompt offer to reinstate a fired worker, it’s best to make the offer sooner rather than later. As one employer recently learned, waiting until after the jury tells you how much you owe in future lost wages will be too late.
Too many employers make one key common mistake when deciding which employee to classify as exempt: They think calling a worker a “manager” or “executive” in the title is all it takes. Not true.
If you plan to hire nurses, software developers or marketing managers next year, prepare to up your advertising budget. Those positions top the hot jobs list compiled by employment research firm Economic Modeling Specialists Intl.
Contacting an applicant’s former employers is an essential step in the hiring process. Trouble is, most supervisors have been trained to provide only the bare minimum, such as dates of employment, job title and salary. Try for more than those bland generalities. Asking the following questions can get applicants’ former bosses to open up.