Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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Worried about terminating an employee because the allegations against him amount to a he-said, she-said situation? Relax. Courts don’t want to become HR departments and don’t want to mediate every dispute.
Some people who speak English well still have thick accents. Asking for clarification or inquiring about the accent isn’t national-origin discrimination, as long as it’s not disrespectful.

It can be frustrating to have to defend your organization against what you consider frivolous claims. Unfortunately, that’s just another cost of doing business. As the following case shows, even when you win the case and thought it should never have been filed, you probably won’t persuade a court to penalize the employee by having him pay your legal fees.

About half of the HR professionals recently surveyed by the Society for Human Resource Management said they have participated in at least one formal job-analysis activity. The goal is usually to identify the key tasks employees perform on the job and the skills they need to do their work successfully.
The EEOC has lost its bid for a preliminary injunction that would have prevented a major employer from withholding funds from the Health Savings Accounts of employees who refused to participate in a wellness program.
Here’s a warning for employers thinking about turning employees into independent contractors to avoid paying benefits and payroll taxes: If some of the employees challenge the decision, you may be in for years of expensive, time-consuming litigation. That can easily turn a penny-pinching strategy into a money pit.
Illinois employers must begin offering a retirement savings plan to employees starting in June 2017. Gov. Pat Quinn signed the Illinois Secure Choice Savings Program Act on Jan. 4, making Illinois the first state to require employers to provide retirement benefits.
When a colleague takes credit for your great idea or a boss suddenly moves up a deadline, your blood may feel as if it is boiling. Could such instances give you high blood pressure?
Starting Jan. 1, Minnesota em­­ployers’ job applications could no longer ask candidates about past criminal convictions. But some employers, including some of the state’s largest, have not completely adapted to the new legal landscape.
An employee who doesn’t receive the commissions he believes he is owed can quit and still receive unemployment compensation.
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