Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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People with health insurance continue to express higher satisfaction with traditional health plans compared with so-called “consumer-driven” plans, but the satisfaction gap appears to be narrowing, according to new research from the Employee Benefit Research Institute.
Psychologically, most of us tend to favor hiring promising outsiders over people we know well. That’s because when we know very little about someone, we might envision a rosy future in which the candidate proves a superstar ...
If you don’t act to prevent off-the-clock work, you could wind up having to defend against multiple lawsuits. That’s because, even if a nationwide class action suit isn’t certified, employees who weren’t involved in an initial lawsuit can sue on their own.
The number of older people who continue to work has increased dramatically in 10 years, with workforce participation among those 65 and older increasing by more than 80%. Here’s the percentage change in work participation by age, from 2006 to 2016.
The National Labor Relations Board has ruled against Love Culture, purveyor of teen clothing, after it fired an employee from its St. Louis Park, Minn. store for discussing pay.
For jobs based on written employment contracts, what the agreement says typically governs all the terms and conditions of employment. If something is unclear or unstated, what the parties do later likely will influence eventual judicial interpretation.
Human resource generalists are the most sought-after HR professionals, with 55% of respondents to a new Society for Human Resource Management survey who are hiring HR talent saying they were hiring for the position.

Here’s a reminder that job duties are what determine exempt status under the Fair Labor Standards Act. You cannot classify someone as exempt based just on job title or education. For example, requiring a college degree for jobs that really could be performed without such training and experience doesn’t magically make the employee ineligible for overtime protection.

A narrow procedural decision by the National Labor Relations Board may be one more sign of a coming change in the definition of “joint employer” and its effect on employers and their business partners.
Do you use software for hiring employees that shares candidates’ basic information with other employer-subscribers? If that software also allows you to mark candidates or former employees as not eligible for hire, be aware that doing so may subject you to defamation claims. That’s what one major bank just learned.
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