Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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Q. Can I rely on verbal promises made by my em­­ployer during my interview, or during my employment as forming part of my contract of employment?

When a New York City employee purports to report wrongdoing on the part of the city government, all that’s required is a good-faith belief that the alleged conduct constituted an “improper governmental action.” It’s illegal to retaliate against an employee who makes such a report.

Summer is here and many teenagers have hit the workforce to earn a few extra dollars. Companies that hire teenagers should be aware that state and federal laws restrict their hours and duties.
Recently, a retired employee challenged her retirement and applied for unemployment, arguing that she never put a retirement request in writing and therefore her employer couldn’t oppose her request for unemployment benefits.
Generally, employees who take FMLA leave are only entitled to their job back if they are able to return to work right after their 12 weeks of time off expires. Imme­­di­­ately terminating the employee without a good reason may backfire, because it could be seen as retaliation for taking leave.

When you settle an employment discrimination complaint or lawsuit, you likely include a “no-rehire” provision. Essentially, you trade some settlement dollars for the former employee’s promise not to apply for work at your company in the future. It’s a way to prevent future failure-to-hire lawsuits. Until now, everyone thought such common settlement provisions were legally valid and enforceable. But now a recent case has cast doubt on that premise by looking at California’s broad prohibitions on restrictive covenants in the Business and Professions Code Section 16600.

Public employees have the right to speak their minds on matters of public importance without punishment. However, that right is clearly limited. A public employee can’t claim that free speech includes the right to use derogatory terms at work.

HR and hiring managers have so many decisions to make when it comes to I-9 and E-Verify compliance. One of the most frequently asked policy decisions is actually quite mundane on its surface, yet the answer can be tricky.

Generally, employees taking an exam required for promotion should be tested under similar circumstances, take the same test and generally be treated the same. But sometimes, especially during a hands-on test, it becomes obvious early on that the employee does not have the skill to pass. If that’s the case, you can end the test early.

To commemorate the 25th anniversary of the ADA’s enactment, here’s a look at some of the hard numbers that define disability at work, as compiled by the U.S. Census Bureau.
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