Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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Two restaurants in Fishkill and Wappingers Falls, N.Y. face charges that their owner regularly denigrated Hispanic employees and insisted they speak English on the job.
A brief, transient medical episode that quickly resolves, leaving a worker as well as before the incident, isn’t a disability and doesn’t mean the employee is covered by the ADA or its later amendments.

Employers have been caught lately taking advantage of the United States’ H-2 visa guest worker program, violating the rules in ways that deprive qualified American workers of employment opportunities. Don’t risk becoming one of those employers or you may end up in the crosshairs of the Department of Labor or the EEOC.

Supervisors sometimes make comments that in retrospect may have been insensitive. That doesn’t mean an employee has a “get out of jail free” card for misbehaving. You can still discipline an insubordinate employee.
More than three-quarters of American workers say their workplace benefits package is important to their decision to take or reject a job, according to new research by the Employee Benefit Research Institute.
G&K Services, which operates laundry facilities under federal contract in seven states, has agreed to pay more than $1.8 million and reform its hiring systems after the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs cited it for systemic discrimination.
With the current version of the Form I-9 set to expire on March 31, 2016, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services earlier this month announced it is seeking public comment on a newly revised “smart” version of the I-9 form. The goal: Reducing errors and preventing confusion.
Q. When, if ever, can our company legally ask an applicant about his or her religious affiliation?

To bring a case of retaliation for complaining about discrimination or harassment, employees must show that they suffered some sort of “adverse employment action” in response to their complaint. That’s easy if the employee is demoted, fired or transferred to a less desirable position. But what if the worker experiences more subtle retaliation, like having to do more work or being transferred to a potentially better position that doesn’t pan out?

An Austin. TX.-area amusement park allegedly took a developmentally disabled janitor for a ride then booted him out of his job. According to an EEOC lawsuit, the man had worked for the company satisfactorily for four years despite having suffered a traumatic brain injury as a child.