Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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Generally, all claims arising out of the same set of facts must be brought in one lawsuit. However, in limited circumstances, it’s possible for an employee to file separate lawsuits against her employer—and her supervisor!
While there’s no requirement to provide a specific discharge reason, you should be ready to document the rationale behind the decision. Note each reason you considered when making the case for termination. You will need that documentation if the employee sues.
A former employee at the Twin Cities Norwegian consulate is asking the country to pay her legal fees after she won a $270,000 equal pay judgment. A federal judge ruled that the woman was paid $30,000 less than a male employee performing comparable work.
You probably receive at least occasional requests from current and former employees to view or receive a copy of their personnel file. This sounds like a straightforward request. But must an employer produce all documents in the employee’s “file?” Must information that may not be in an employee’s file be produced?
Employees filed 8,826 charges of racial harassment with the EEOC in fiscal year 2014, the most ever. In 10 years, racial harassment charges have increased by 58%.
You don’t need to crack down on minor pools, but you should write a policy on habitual gambling at work. The real danger of office bracketology lies in its effect on compulsive gamblers who may be on your payroll.

Even after an employee who has participated in employment lawsuits or complaints is discharged for entirely legitimate reasons, he may later sue if he isn’t rehired. Then he’ll try to argue that his prior protected activity was the reason he wasn’t rehired. To avoid such lawsuits, make sure the hiring manager knows little or nothing about those prior activities.

The California Supreme Court has held that the on-call hours for security guards who work 24-hour shifts constituted compensable hours worked. The court also ruled that the guards’ employer could not exclude “sleep time” from the guards’ 24-hour shifts.
Asked by CareerBuilder.com what caused them to straggle in late, 3,000 U.S. employees most often blamed slow traffic and oversleeping.
Not every complaint amounts to “protected activity” that shields an employee from retaliation.
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