Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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The Affordable Care Act requires employers of 50 or more to provide lactation rooms so nursing women can feed their babies or express breast milk. The rooms must be clean and private—and importantly, they can’t be restrooms. Johns Hopkins University and Health System decided not only to meet the law’s requirements, but exceed them. The result is a model that other employers may want to copy.

A former Washington political correspondent for New York-based Bloom­­berg News claims the company fired her because of her pregnancy. She filed the charges with the D.C Superior Court, alleging that management’s attitude changed toward her after she announced it.
You are probably accustomed to meeting with individual employees who have problems with a manager. But what do you do when a handful of employees request a meeting with HR? Don’t be flustered, intimidated or decline to meet. Use the following plan to handle the situation.
Large U.S. employers are keeping health care costs down despite concerns over Affordable Care Act mandates, according to a new report by the ADP Research Institute.
The EEOC has lost an important test of a novel theory that could have changed how some severance agreements are structured. It wanted to forbid requiring workers to waive the right to sue if they were converted from employees to independent contractors.
When “Pomp and Circumstance” plays at college commencement ceremonies next month, graduates can march confidently off stage knowing that their job prospects look good.
A lawsuit filed in California alleges that Handy, the sharing economy’s version of a cleaning service, is playing dirty with its workers. Like its brethren—Uber, Taskrabbits and others—the company uses independent contractors instead of employees.

It’s considered protected activity when employees complain about harassment based on ethnicity or other protected characteristics such as sex, race or religion. That means employers can’t retaliate against employees for having filed a harassment complaint. Now a court has clarified the obvious: Promoting an employee isn’t retaliation.

Employers won a major victory April 10 when that court ruled that telecommuting is not always a reasonable accommodation, even for jobs that can mostly be done from home.
Employees on FMLA don’t earn protection against legitimate discipline for reasons unrelated to FMLA leave.
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