Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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How can employers actually use the new CEO-to-median-employee pay ratio rule to their advantage?
When the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage nationwide, plenty of HR pros started to wonder: Do we even need to offer health benefits to employees’ domestic partners anymore?

Discharged employees often sue, counting on their protected status—based on race, sex, national origin and so on—to create the impression that they were fired for discriminatory reasons. That’s why it’s important to use a progressive discipline system. It lets you counter discrimination allegations with solid, documented performance or behavior problems that warranted discharge.

What should you do if you receive reports that a manager has uttered offensive slurs?

Employers have the right to set reasonable call-off requirements for when an employee will miss a shift or arrive late. Employees can be required to follow those rules. If someone doesn’t, you can discipline him—even if you approved FMLA leave for the absence. But beware: If you don’t consistently enforce the call-off rule, you may be on the losing end of an FMLA lawsuit.

It happens regularly: An employee is facing escalating discipline and fears for her job—so she files a surprise sexual harassment or discrimination lawsuit, hoping to stop her firing. But you can fire her—if you can provide complete disciplinary records to justify that the decision had nothing to do with her complaint.

The U.S. Department of Labor has issued a new set of guidelines that clarify when employers can classify workers as independent contractors.
The Securities and Exchange Commission on Aug. 5 adopted a final rule that requires public companies to disclose the ratio of chief executive officer compensation to the median compensation employees receive.
When one CEO decided to pay all his employees at least $70,000 per year, accolades rolled in. The raises even came out of the CEO’s own compensation package. So why, then, did there come such terrific backlash?
Contractors performing work for governmental agencies are protected by the First Amendment right to free speech as if they were public employees.
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