Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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A narrow procedural decision by the National Labor Relations Board may be one more sign of a coming change in the definition of “joint employer” and its effect on employers and their business partners.
Do you use software for hiring employees that shares candidates’ basic information with other employer-subscribers? If that software also allows you to mark candidates or former employees as not eligible for hire, be aware that doing so may subject you to defamation claims. That’s what one major bank just learned.
A Texas company has agreed to settle a disability bias suit filed by a former employee after the EEOC accused its HR department of playing doctor in violation of the ADA.
Employees discharged for being absent may still be eligible for unemployment compensation. That’s because employees must have committed willful misconduct to lose the right to benefits. An employee fired for missing work because he couldn’t call in or otherwise comply with his employer’s call-off procedure, for example, would still be eligible.
A Texas appellate court has upheld the discharge of a teacher for financial reasons. The case shows school districts have great discretion to determine which employees to cut and don’t have to be bogged down in a detailed examination.
Well-paid private-sector employees are more than three times more likely to participate in an employer-sponsored retirement plan than their lower-paid colleagues.
If you have employees like that, carefully document the behavior. Then apply appropriate discipline, especially if the employee is insubordinate. Just make sure that everyone else with a similar work record is also punished the same way.
Comments are pouring in to the U.S. Department of Labor at a rate of more than 500 per week in advance of a Sept. 4 deadline for employers and others to register their opinions on a rule that the Obama administration says could make 5 million more white-collar workers eligible for overtime pay if they work more than 40 hours in a week.

On July 6, the U.S. Department of Labor published a 295-page Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) seeking public comments on proposed changes to the “white collar” overtime exemption regulations. The comment period closed on Sept. 4. The DOL proposes specific changes to the salary level requirements for the majority of the white collar exemptions and also seeks commentary regarding potential changes to the duties tests for the exemptions.

How can employers actually use the new CEO-to-median-employee pay ratio rule to their advantage?
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