Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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Despite well-publicized moves by retailers such as Walmart, Starbucks and Whole Foods to raise the pay of their lowest-level workers, 72% of organizations with minimum-wage employees have no plans to pay them more.
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott signed two pieces of legislation into law recently, regulating where and how Texans may carry firearms. As of Jan. 1, licensed gun owners may carry holstered handguns anywhere that concealed handguns are per­mitted—with some exceptions.
The EEOC last month published Living with HIV Infection, which explains how employees and applicants are protected from bias and harassment due to their HIV status.
Q: “I've discovered that at our publishing company of 75 people, each employee has a single personnel file into which all documents go—everything from their new-hire paperwork to performance reviews to doctor’s notes. How must we separate this information going forward to keep legally compliant? We’re supposed to split off certain medical information so that each employee will have different sorts of files, correct?” – Theo, Maryland
Under federal law and New York state law, merely rejecting a supervisor’s sexual advances without reporting the conduct to HR probably isn’t protected activity. However, that’s not the case under the New York City Human Rights Law.
Many employers now track attendance using biometric scanners that require an employee to clock in and out by scanning a fingerprint or a palmprint. New York employers should note a statute that limits the collection of biometric data.
Employers are working hard to rein in prescription drug spending, according to new research by Towers Watson.
The Texas Supreme Court has vacated a jury verdict in favor of a former employee who had alleged workers’ compensation retaliation, rendering judgment in favor of the employer.

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has clarified rules for noncompete agreements entered into after an employee has been hired. It has concluded for the first time that the employer must offer the employee (and the employee must accept) something of value beyond just a mutual promise to make the agreement binding. This has practical consequences for employers adopting or modifying employment agreements.

Watch out for a growing litigation danger known as association discrimination. More courts are allowing ADA lawsuits to move forward based on suspicion that an employee who has a disabled family member was punished because he might miss work in the future.