Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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It’s a violation of California’s Fair Employment and Housing Act for a supervisor to use an employee’s sexuality as a vehicle for making work life miserable. That’s true even if it wasn’t motivated by sexual desire. Bullying someone through sexual threats is sexual harassment.
A new rule issued by the Department of Labor Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs explicitly gives employees of federal contractors and subcontractors the right to discuss how much they are paid.
Language can be a big factor in who you attract to your company, and job postings can skew toward male stereotypes, reports Emily Peck for The Huffington Post. There are several words and phrases that can hint at an unconscious bias in an organization.
We’ve said it before: Document every disciplinary action and be specific. The employer in this case won because it had excellent contemporaneous records to explain its disciplinary action.

Employees who quit their jobs for “necessitous and compelling” reasons may still be eligible for unemployment compensation benefits. Quitting because of medical problems sometimes qualifies. That’s why employers should consider offering accommodations if an employee says he needs to quit for medical reasons. An accommodation offer may mean there’s no “necessitous and compelling” reason to quit.

The real action in the 2016 election is still months away, but political discord is already in mid-campaign form. If water-cooler chatter has been more heated than you would like, you may be tempted to put a gag order on political speech. That’s not a smart move.

Treating an applicant rudely or making snap judgments can mean ending up in court, trying to defend against charges of race or other perceived discrimination. Here’s a case you can use as an example of how not to greet an applicant even if you are sure he won’t be hired.

Under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, commonly known as SOX, employees who report alleged accounting irregularities internally and to OSHA are protected from retaliation if their employer punishes the activity. Making simple statements that aren’t very specific can be enough to meet the employee’s reporting requirement under the law. It’s enough that the employee reasonably believes that he is reporting wrongdoing. He doesn’t have to know the details, just that it probably violates the law.

The issues raised by this NFL controversy provide great lessons for those tasked with conducting an investigation in the workplace.
Just because religion was mentioned at work doesn’t mean you will lose a religious harassment lawsuit.
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