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Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

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Here’s yet another reason to stop employees who sexually harass female co-workers, subordinates or customers: Men who work in that environment but refuse to join in can also sue for sexual harassment. It’s not just the harassed women who have claims.
While the widening pool of potential recruits is good news for managers, it underscores the importance of conducting an interview that attracts the best candidate.
More employees are acting as their own attorneys when they sue employers or prospective employers. The reason may be simple: Word is getting around that some federal courts are making it easy to do.
Four major Silicon Valley-based tech companies—Apple, Google, Intel and Adobe Systems—announced a settlement in April in a closely watched lawsuit accusing them of conspiring to hold down salaries in the tech industry.
Q. Is it legal to hire only U.S. citizens and, when advertising, say that people must be citizens to apply?
It’s a question that interests policymakers and employers alike: When workers leave or change jobs, what do they do with their employment-based retirement savings—and why?
President Obama made good on his June 16 promise that he would ban federal contractors from discriminating against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender workers and job applicants. An executive order signed July 21 applies to companies with contracts worth $10,000 or more.

Employees have to file EEOC complaints within 300 days of alleged discrimination or lose the right to sue. Similarly, they have to file state claims within 180 days of the alleged discriminatory act. If they miss those deadlines, they can’t sue. Repeatedly changing one’s mind about a situation involving an allegedly discriminatory act doesn’t extend or revive the deadline.

On July 22, a three-judge panel of the District of Columbia Circuit Court of Appeals dealt a potentially lethal blow to the Affordable Care Act, ruling that health insurance premium subsidies on which the ACA’s individual mandate depends are illegal in states that don’t run their own insurance exchanges. Two hours later, a panel of the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals reached exactly the opposite conclusion.

Starbucks got a lot of attention this summer when it announced it would help its baristas—even part-timers—pay for online college classes offered by Arizona State University. That’s news for three reasons.

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