Human Resources

From employment law to compensation and benefits, FMLA and hiring and firing and more, Business Management Daily provides comprehensive Human Resources updates.

Discover how your colleagues – and competitors – are dealing with discrimination and harassment, employment law, benefits programs, and more.

That little old law that employers love to hate may be in for a shake-up, one that you just might enjoy. Political winds seem to be blowing strong enough, and ...
When Jack Jay tore his Achilles' tendon, his doctor said he shouldn't work anymore in a job that involved climbing. Unfortunately, his position as a millwright required him to climb stairs ...
Don't forget about ergonomics just because Congress scrapped the Clinton administration's controversial rules. Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) can still hurt your bottom line, ...
If you're weighing the costs of testing workers to predict future disabilities, don't forget to count the attorney fees. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) recently called genetic testing by ...
Go-getters often assume that once they excel in a line position (one that has a direct effect on profit and loss), they should build their responsibilities as line managers and bypass any staff jobs (support roles such as research, human resources, planning) that they’re offered.
You want to earn the trust of your staff, but that’s hard when you’re forced to carry out changes that neither you nor your team agree with.
The city of Chicago fired Daniel Pernice after he was arrested off duty for disorderly conduct and possessing cocaine. He argued that his addiction was a disability and having drugs was ...
As Mary Flaherty saw it, her bosses at Metromail were running an organized campaign to make her so miserable that she'd quit. Flaherty, 61, says supervisors subjected her to sexist and ...
Pilot Robert Konop was so upset with his employer and the union that he created a Web site to vent his feelings, even accusing the company president of fraud and comparing ...
If you use contingent workers, both you and the staffing agency may be considered "employers," which means you share the duty of accommodating a disabled worker, according to new guidance from ...